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Chromium/Chrome and GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

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  • After a decade of Chromebooks, it’s time for Chrome OS to sort apps in the Launcher

    I can’t believe it’s 2020 and I’m saying this, but you still cannot sort applications of any kind on a Chromebook.

    When a new app is installed, the app shortcut simply gets added to the next available space in the Chrome OS Launcher and when that space is full, a new Launcher page is created with the next app shortcut appearing.

    [...]

    What has made this situation markedly worse over the past few years is the addition of both Android and Linux apps. At least for the latter, any Linux app installs made through Chrome OS get grouped in a folder called Linux Apps. That doesn’t happen with Progressive Web Apps or Android software.

    You can create your own app folders and manage apps yourself if you want, so that’s something. But one of the things I like about Chrome OS is that the operating system doesn’t get in your way. Meaning: it lets you focus on doing things, not managing things.

    So even a basic sort feature by type of app (Android, Chrome OS, Linux, and PWA) would a start. Alphabetical app sorting would be a nice option too.

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  • 5 must-have terminal commands for Linux on your Chromebook

    We’ve spent a lot of time over the past week exploring what is possible on Chrome OS. Thanks to some updates to the Linux container, we’ve installed Windows 10 and a variety of Linux flavors. I love tinkering with Chrome OS to see how far I can push the maturing ecosystem but today, we’re going to focus on what the Linux container is currently designed to do. That, of course, it to run the Debian framework and allow users to install compatible Linux applications on Chrome OS. Doing so doesn’t require you to be a Linux guru and thank goodness for that. I’m still learning as I go but mastering the Chrome OS Linux terminal doesn’t have to be a terrifying or even daunting.

  • 11 Best Web Development Extensions for Chrome

    When developing a website, you have to make a checklist of many complex requirements. Whether dealing with color or font schemes, CSS layout problems, or website responsiveness on various devices, it is important to stay on top of any emerging issues. The following are some of the best web development extensions for Google Chrome (and other Chromium-based browsers).

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