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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • PAM by example: Use authconfig to modify PAM
  • Learning NFS through server and client configuration
  • World domination with cgroups part 8: down and dirty with cgroup v2

    Thanks for joining me again as we continue to look at cgroup v2, which became available with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. This time around, I’d like to take a very deep look at the virtual file system used to control the cgroup controllers and the special files inside. Understanding this will be necessary for doing custom work that used to be the domain of libcgroup (first introduced in RHEL 6, and not recommended for use in RHEL 8). We’re also going to try some fun with cpusets, which are now fully working with RHEL and systemd for the first time ever!

  • Build secure applications with OpenShift 4.3 on public cloud

    Building secure applications that ensure data privacy and security when deployed to a cloud environment is crucial for businesses that collect customer data, particularly for regulated industries like finance, retail, banking, and others. In this article, I introduce you to an example credit card application my team built to explore and share approaches for creating secure cloud-based applications with OpenShift 4.3 on IBM Cloud.

    We built the example credit card application with just a few straight-forward microservices that record dynamic user transactions in a PostgreSQL database. The JavaScript simulator application presents a Web-based view of a mobile application run by a Node.js service running inside an OpenShift cluster.

  • Ben Williams: F32-20200804 updated Live isos Released

    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated F32-20200804-Live ISOs, carrying the 5.7.11-200 kernel.

    This set of updated isos will save considerable amounts of updates after install. ((for new installs.)(New installs of Workstation have about 900+MB of updates)).

    A huge thank you goes out to irc nicks dowdle, dbristow, Southern-Gentleman for testing these iso.

  • Dan Williams: Kubernetes Watches will ghost you without warning

    Alternate title: if you’re ahead of Clayton you’re doing well, at least for a few hours.

    [...]

    Watches can and do terminate at any time, gracefully or not. Sometimes a new apiserver leader is elected and the old one terminates watches and clients must reconnect to the new leader. Sometimes the leader just goes away because its node got rebooted. Sometimes there’s a network hiccup and the HTTP connection backing the watch times out. Regardless of the cause, they happen and your code needs to handle them. OpenShift CI forces frequent leader elections to specifically catch these issues before they get to customers.

    A watch stuffs events into a Go channel. The code using the watch reads events out of the channel, usually in a for loop (to continuously grab events) with a select block (to ensure individual read operations don’t block which enables cancelation when the channel returned by ctx.Done() is closed). Reading from a Go channel (case event := <-pvcWatch.ResultChan()) returns an optional second boolean indicating whether the channel has been closed.

    The testcase loop doesn’t exit until either the testcase times out and the ctx.Done() channel is closed, one of the event handler cases fails the testcase, or the PersistentVolumeClaim is deleted. So what happens if the Watch is closed unexpectedly and nothing checks whether the channel is closed?

  • Copr: EOL Copr APIv1 and APIv2

    During Copr history, we got three APIs. For a long time, we maintained all versions.

    We decided that it is time to remove the old versions. We are going to start with APiv1.

  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 To Be Generally Available This Week

    Red Hat has announced that Red Hat Virtualization 4.4, the latest update to its virtualization solution for traditional virtual machine (VM)-based workloads, will be generally available this week.

    With this latest release, Red Hat Virtualization is now rebased to Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2. It is said to offer a more seamless integration with Red Hat OpenShift, providing a solution that can launch the next-generation of cloud-native applications while providing a foundation for VMs today.

    “Based on RHEL 8.2, Red Hat Virtualization 4.4 inherits all of the stability, performance and security improvements that you trust for your most business critical workloads while adding new capabilities that make it even easier to manage a large virtual environment,” the company said.

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Mozilla Thunderbird 78.3 Is Out and You Can Finally Upgrade from Earlier Versions

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Android Leftovers

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