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Time to start casting the Linux "Switch" commercials

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Linux

Open-source software proponents may end up owing Microsoft a big, ironic thank you for finally getting Vista out the door. Release of the new version of Windows has forced IT folks in the public and private sector to make some serious plans about their upgrade paths, and that could be working in favor of Linux.

Among government agencies, an important market for Microsoft, the Transportation Department has already put a moratorium on upgrades to Vista -- as well as Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer 7 -- while it examines cost and compatibility issues and looks at alternatives, including Linux. Now, according to Information Week, the top technology official at the Federal Aviation Administration is considering grounding Microsoft software in favor of a combination of Google's new online business applications running on Linux-based hardware. "We have discussions going on with Dell," said Chief Information Officer David Bowen. "We're trying to figure out what our roadmap will be after we're no longer able to acquire Windows XP." Microsoft still has a chance to retain the business, he said, if it could resolve the compatibility problems and make a case for its substantially higher costs.

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re: Switch commercials

Don't forget to cast TWO Linux actors. One to be "Linux" and one to be "Sudo". Linux will ALWAYS have to ask SUDO for permission before he moves, speaks, answers a question, or smiles at the camera (can't be too safe from yourself seems to be the motto of todays linux users).

"Sudo" could use the "shoosh/zip-it routine" from the "Austin Powers" series everytime that Linux tries to speak but forgets to get permission from "Sudo" first.

Sort of like the UAC guy in the Vista/Mac commercial, only way more snarky (annoying).

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