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today's leftovers

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  • oneAPI compatibility with all openSUSE

    As leader of the openSUSE Innovator initiative, openSUSE member and official oneAPI innovator, I tested the new release of the tool on openSUSE Leap 15.1, 15.2 and Tumbleweed. With the total success of the work, I made available in the SDB an article on how to install this solution on the openSUSE platform. More information here: https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Install_oneAPI.

    oneAPI is an Unified, Standards-Based Programming Model. Modern workload diversity necessitates the need for architectural diversity; no single architecture is best for every workload. XPUs, including CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and other accelerators, are required to extract high performance.

    This technology have the tools needed to deploy applications and solutions across these architectures. Its set of complementary toolkits—a base kit and specialty add-ons—simplify programming and help developers improve efficiency and innovation. The core Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler and libraries implement the oneAPI industry specifications available at https://www.oneapi.com/open-source/.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/31

    Week 31 has seen a steady flow of snapshots. The biggest snapshot was 0721, for which we had to do a full rebuild due to changes in the krb5 package, that moved some files around. In order for all packages to keep up with this change, the full rebuild was needed. The week in total has seen 7 snapshots being published (0721, 0724, 0726, 0727, 0728, 0729 and 0730)

  • Does Your Organization Need an Open Source Program Office?

    Every modern enterprise uses some open source software, or at the very least uses software that has open-source components. In an enterprise setting, the number of different open source projects an organization might use could easily be in the hundreds of thousands, and there could also easily be just as many engineers using those open source projects.

    While the reality is that enterprises use open source software, open source communities have a completely different culture — one focused on collaboration in a way that is foreign to most standard business environments.

    “As a business, it’s a culture change,” explained Jeff McAffer, who ran Microsoft’s Open Source Program Office for years and now is a director of product at GitHub focused on promoting open source in enterprises. “Many companies, they’re not used to collaboration. They’re not used to engaging with teams outside of their company.”

    What exactly are Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs)? What do they do, who needs them and why? We spoke with a couple of people who lead open source program offices to learn more.

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  • 50 Open Badges awarded for top LibreOffice translators!

    A few months ago, we announced Open Badges for LibreOffice contributors. These are custom images with embedded metadata, awarded to our most active community members to say thanks for their great work!

    The metadata describes the contributor’s work, and the badge can be verified using an external service. Open Badges are used by other free software projects, such as Fedora.

  • Ordering Browser Tabs Chronologically to Support Task Continuity

    Product teams working on Firefox at Mozilla have long been interested in helping people get things done, whether that’s completing homework for school, shopping for a pair of shoes, or doing one’s taxes. We are deeply invested in how we can support task continuity, the various steps that people take in getting things done, in our browser products. And we know that in our browsers, tabs play an important role for people carrying out tasks.

    [...]

    Fast forward to this year and the team working on Firefox for iOS was interested in how we might support task continuity involving leaving tabs open. We continued to see in user research the important role that tabs play in task continuity, and we wanted to explore how to make tab retrieval and overall tab management easier.

    In most web browsers on smartphones, tabs are ordered based on when a person first opened them, with the oldest tabs on one end of the interface (top, bottom, left, or right) and the newest tabs stacking to the opposite end of the interface. This ordering logic gets more complex if a new tab is prompted to open when someone taps on a link in an existing tab. A site may be designed to launch links in new tabs or a person may choose to open new tabs for links. The new tab, in that case, typically will open immediately next to the tab where the link was tapped, pushing all other later tabs toward the other end of the interface. All of this gets even trickier when managing more than just a few tabs. This brief demonstration illustrates tab ordering logic in Firefox for iOS before chronological tabs using the example of someone shopping for a good processor.

  • Tor’s Bug Smash Fund: Year Two!

    The Bug Smash Fund is back for its second year! In 2019, we launched Tor’s Bug Smash Fund to find and fix bugs in our software and conduct routine maintenance. Maintenance isn’t a flashy new feature, and that makes it less interesting to many traditional funders, but it’s what keeps the reliable stuff working--and with your support, we were able to close 77 tickets as a result.

    These bugs and issues ranged from maintenance on mechanisms for sending bridges via email and collecting metrics data to improving tor padding, testing, onion services, documentation, Tor Browser UX, and tooling for development. This work keeps Tor Browser, the Tor network, and the many tools that rely on Tor strong, safe, and running smoothly.

  • Say hello to the Linux Terminal 2.0 for Chrome OS

    Back in March, prior to the Chrome OS release calendar getting out of whack, the Linux terminal for Chrome OS was undergoing a major facelift that looked to be slated for the release of version 82. Since I generally live in the Canary channel, I was unaware that the update had not taken place. Instead, the refreshed Linux terminal actually arrived in the latest update to Chrome OS 84. Some of you reading this may be thinking “what the heck is a Linux terminal?” and that’s okay. Here’s a quick history lesson.

More in Tux Machines

Here’s Why Switching to Linux Makes Sense in 2021

Linux does have several benefits over Windows and macOS in certain areas. People are realizing it, and it is slowly gaining popularity in the desktop OS market. Of course, the majority of desktop users still swear by Windows or macOS, but a greater number of users are trying out new Linux distributions to see if they can switch to Linux. They may have heard good things about Linux as a desktop choice, or just want to try something different while confined to their homes. Who knows? Here, I will be presenting you all the good reasons why Linux makes more sense in 2021. Read more

today's leftovers

  • LHS Episode #416: The Weekender LXXIII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Donation button removed

    Over the years, I have blown hot and cold over whether to have a donation button. Did take it down for awhile, about a year ago I think. I received an email asking if can send me a bank cheque, which reminded me about that donation button. I declined the offer. I really don't need donations. It is really my pleasure to upload blog reports about EasyOS, Puppy, DIY hiking gear, and all the rest that have posted about. Ibiblio.org is still very kindly hosting downloads, and I also went back to the Puppy Forum.

  • Akademy 2021 – I

    I am still digesting the load of information that Marc Mutz gave in his intense training session last night between 6 and almost 11 p.m. about C++/STL history, containers, iterators, allocators, the Non-Owning Interface Idiom and all that other good stuff. Great job Marc.

  • Stuck Updates Fix

    When rolling out a new feature that lets you skip (offline) updates on boot-up earlier this week we have messed up and also brought in a nasty bug that prevents updates from applying. Unfortunately we can’t automatically rectify this problem because, well, updates are never applied. In case you find Discover showing the same updates over and over again, even after rebooting to apply the update, you may be affected.

  • AWS SSM Parameters

    If you are not familiar with the Parameter Store it provides hierarchical storage for config data, strings, and other values. As well as being used for storing private information the parameter store provides a public namespace for SUSE, /aws/service/suse, which is now being leveraged to provide the latest image id’s for all active SUSE images.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Steam on ChromeOS: Not a Rumor Anymore - Boiling Steam

    If you follow us or other sources like Chrome Unboxed you are by now aware that there’s ample rumors about Google/Valve working on bringing Steam on ChromeOS. We know the technology pieces are there, as recently discussed with Luke Short in our recent podcast. However, we are still waiting for an official announcement that would turn the expected rumors into reality.

  • First American Financial Pays Farcical $500K Fine

    In May 2019, KrebsOnSecurity broke the news that the website of mortgage settlement giant First American Financial Corp. [NYSE:FAF] was leaking more than 800 million documents — many containing sensitive financial data — related to real estate transactions dating back 16 years. This week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission settled its investigation into the matter after the Fortune 500 company agreed to pay a paltry penalty of less than $500,000.

  • How Russian threats in the 2000s turned this country into the go-to expert on cyber defense

    Estonia is no stranger to the cyber threat posed by Russia. Back in 2007, a decision to relocate a Soviet-era war memorial from central Tallinn to a military cemetery sparked a diplomatic spat with its neighbor and former overlord. There were protests and angry statements from Russian diplomats. And just as the removal works started, Estonia became the target of what was at the time the biggest cyberattack against a single country.

    The Estonian government called the incident an act of cyberwarfare and blamed Russia for it. Moscow has denied any involvement.

    The attack made Estonia realize that it needed to start treating cyber threats in the same way as physical attacks.

  • Most Businesses That Pay Off After Ransomware Hack Hit With Second Attack: Study [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The study surveyed nearly 1,300 security professionals around the world and found that 80 percent of businesses that paid after a ransomware attack suffered a second attack. Of those hit a second time, 46 percent believed it came from the same group that did the first attack.

    Censuswide, which performed the study on behalf of the international cybersecurity company Cybereason, found that 25 percent of organizations hit by a ransomware attack were forced to close. In addition, 29 percent were forced to eliminate jobs.

Kernel: Oracle, UPower, and Linux Plumbers Conference

  • Oracle Sends Out Latest Linux Patches So Trenchboot Can Securely Launch The Kernel - Phoronix

    Trenchboot continues to be worked on for providing boot integrity technologies that allow for multiple roots of trust around boot security and integrity. Oracle engineers on Friday sent out their latest Linux kernel patches so it can enjoy a "Secure Launch" by the project's x86 dynamic launch measurements code. The latest kernel patches are a second revision to patches sent out last year around the Trenchboot launch support for enhancing the integrity and security of the boot process. This kernel work goes along with Trenchboot support happening for GRUB.

  • Nearly A Decade Later, UPower Still Working Towards 1.0 Release

    For nearly one decade there has been talk of UPower 1.0 while in 2021 that still has yet to materialize for this former "DeviceKit-Power" project but at least now there is UPower v0.99.12 as the first release in two years. UPower 1.0 has yet to materialize and it certainly isn't advancing these days like it was in the early 2010s. With Thursday's UPower 0.99.12 release the key changes to land over the past two years are supporting more device types and power reporting for newer Apple iPhone smartphones like the iPhone XR, XS, and other newer models.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2021 Linux Plumbers Conference. Tracing in the Linux kernel is constantly improving. Tracing was officially added to Linux in 2008. Since then, more tooling has been constantly added to help out with visibility. The work is still ongoing, with Perf, ftrace, Lttng, and eBPF. User space tooling is expanding and as the kernel gets more complex, so does the need for facilitating seeing what is going on under the hood.