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Atari VCS FAQ offers fresh console details and focus from COO Michael Arzt

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Hardware
Gaming
Ubuntu

For about as long as the Atari VCS has been in development, critics have often wondered about who this device is marketed towards and what it’s packing under the hood to execute and deliver once it’s in the living room. To that end, Atari VCS COO Michael Arzt recently published a lengthy FAQ to try to clear up some of the remaining mysteries about the device. Among the many questions taken on, Arzt goes into further detail on the tech of the VCS, as well as Atari’s priorities in game availability and customer appeal.

Michael Arzt published a Q&A on the Atari VCS on Medium on July 29, 2020. The goal of the publishing was to answer many of the common questions that are still coming up in regards to the purpose and priorities of the Atari VCS. Interestingly enough, Arzt claims it’s wrong to think of it as a “retro console” such as the Atari Flashback and other such devices.

“The Atari VCS is a much more powerful PC-based device, with a premium build quality, significantly more power, internet access, and an online store full of games, apps and streaming services, so it really can’t be compared to the “throwback” consoles,” Arzt wrote.

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Atari VCS games cost up to $25, will focus on indies and not AAA

  • Atari VCS games cost up to $25, will focus on indies and not AAA games

    The Atari VCS is a kind of jack-of-all-trades. It's a console-PC hybrid that supports Linux and Windows 10. It's also a console with its own first-party storefront, controllers, and online ecosystem. But unlike Steam or the PlayStation Store, the Atari VCS store won't sell $59.99 AAA games--at least not at launch. Instead, the Atari VCS games will be capped at $25 a pop and will be more like GOG than Steam.

    Atari is taking a smaller approach with its store and will exclusively sell remasters, classic version of its old games, and indie games at launch, complete with its vault of 100 Atari classics, Anstream on-demand retro game streaming, and remasters of older games like Missile Command.

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