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How To Speed Up The Nautilus File Browser

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HowTos

I ran across a few settings the other day that can help speed up your Nautilus file browser within gnome. This would work for those of you on older machines, of even those that want to get a little more out of your newer machines.

Here are a few things you can configure to speed up Nautilus. First you’ll need to open a Nautilus browser by selecting Places > Home or by opening any other folder that you have available. You’ll then want to navigate to Edit > Preferences and look for the Preview tab.

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How To Install Audio Preview For Nautilus

My post yesterday on how to speed up the nautilus file manager mentioned turning off the audio preview feature. Based on a few comments I realize that I have never mentioned how to turn this feature on in the first place. It is pretty simple really, and I’m surprised that I’ve overlooked it thus far–I always install it first thing. It is actually part of another previous post, 5 steps to a new installation, but not in detail on its own.

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