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Configuring a Linux home internet gateway

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HowTos

My family is hooked on Windows. I’ve thought about trying to coerce them into switching to GNU/Linux, but the very thought of what I’d have to put up with for the next year just makes my head ache. I’m not talking about software maintenance issues. I’m talking about trying to defend my position time and time again as they complain that they can’t run their favorite games or applications. Telling them to change their favorites is like spitting into the wind—it’s sort of masochistic.

I love Linux though, and so this opposition doesn’t stop me from wanting to setup a Linux machine at home. I upgrade my wife’s computer in the study about once every couple of years, and often my kids’ machines get a parts upgrade from the old machine at the same time. Recently, however, I found I had enough spare parts to put together an entire machine, so I took the opportunity to replace my LinkSys router with a custom Linux router. In this article, I’d like to describe this process because it was more difficult for me than it probably should have been—mostly for lack of clear instructions.

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re: configuring a linux home gateway

And another set of Internet zombies are born.

The hackers in China, Russia, Korea must practically wet themselves in glee over articles like these.

What a absolute TERRIBLE idea. Lets all get a bunch of noobs who can't spell TCP let alone understand how the internet works all making their own "firewall" (with a default Linux install - running a ton of un-needed services - and a GUI to boot!).

If you don't (really) understand networking, stick to a small router/firewall appliance. Not only will you save a bunch of money on electricity, but you'll be safer (and I won't have to block your DDNS IP Range at my upstream router).

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