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Graphics: Zink, VA-API, NVIDIA's NVAPI SDK

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Graphics/Benchmarks

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Extensions

    Usually I cover in-depth looks at various chunks of code I’ve been working on, but today it’s going to be a more traditional style of modern blogging: memes and complaining.

  • New VA-API H.264 decoder in gst-plugins-bad

    Recently, a new H.264 decoder, using VA-API, was merged in gst-plugins-bad.

    Why another VA-based H.264 decoder if there is already gstreamer-vaapi?

    As usual, an historical perspective may give some clues.

    It started when Seungha Yang implemented the GStreamer decoders for Windows using DXVA2 and D3D11 APIs.

    Perhaps we need one step back and explain what are stateless decoders.

  • NVIDIA open sourced part of NVAPI SDK to aid 'Windows emulation environments'

    NVIDIA sneakily put out a little open source release recently, with a part of the NVAPI SDK now under the MIT license.

    This was mentioned by the crew working on the DXVK translation layer in the VKx Discord, who sent along word to me as well. NVAPI is NVIDIA's core software development kit that allows direct access to NVIDIA GPUs and drivers on all Windows platforms.

    Now, that doesn't sound interesting for Linux obviously but here's why this actually is important: in the NVAPI Open Source SDK, it directly mentions that the contained "nvapi.h" file that's now provided under the MIT license was done to enable "open source re-implementations of NVAPI for Windows emulation environments"—so the Wine and Proton compatibility layers are what they're getting at without naming them directly.

WebRender and Firefox

  • Mozilla GFX: moz://gfx newsletter #54

    Bonjour à tous et à toutes, this is episode 54 of your favorite and only Firefox graphics newsletter. From now on instead of peeling through commit logs, I will be simply gathering notes sent to me by the rest of the team. This means the newsletter will be shorter, hopefully a bit less overwhelming with only the juicier bits. It will also give yours-truly more time to fix bugs instead of writing about it.

    Lately we have been enabling WebRender for a lot more users. For the first time, WebRender is enabled by default in Nightly for Windows 7 and macOS users with modern GPUs. Today 78% of Nightly users have WebRender, 40% on beta, 22% release enabled. Not all of these configurations are ready to ride the trains yet, but the numbers are going to keep going up over the next few releases.

There Finally Is Work On Shipping Mozilla's WebRender...

  • There Finally Is Work On Shipping Mozilla's WebRender For Some Linux Environments

    While Mozilla has been gradually enabling WebRender out-of-the-box in more Windows configurations with succeeding Firefox releases, up to now there hasn't been much visible effort in getting WebRender enabled out-of-the-box for any Linux configurations. But fortunately that is finally changing.

    Linux users have been able to opt-in to this generally faster code path via MOZ_WEBRENDER=1 among other WebRender tunables within Firefox. This is for the GPU-based Rust-written rendering engine available within Firefox currently and also at the heart of their Servo effort. But as more Firefox installations on Windows have been seeing WebRender enabled, Linux users have not.

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