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Debian 8 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

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Debian

The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 8 "jessie" support has reached its end-of-life on June 30, 2020, five years after its initial release on April 26, 2015.

Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 8. A subset of "jessie" packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 9 "stretch", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS Team has taken over support from the Security Team on July 6, 2020 while the final point update for "stretch" will be released on July 18, 2020.

Debian 9 will also receive Long Term Support for five years after its initial release with support ending on June 30, 2022. The supported architectures remain amd64, i386, armel and armhf. In addition we are pleased to announce, for the first time support will be extended to include the arm64 architecture.

For further information about using "stretch" LTS and upgrading from "jessie" LTS, please refer to LTS/Using.

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Debian LTS Team Will No Longer Support Debian 8 ‘Jessie’

  • Debian LTS Team Will No Longer Support Debian 8 ‘Jessie’ GNU/Linux

    On June 30, 2020, the long-term Debian 8 “Jessie” reached its end-of-life (EOL). Subsequently, the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team has officially announced that it will no longer provide further security patches or any other updates to Debian 8.

    Hence, if you’re using Debian 8, you should upgrade your system to the next long-term Debian 9 “Stretch.” However, you can still extend the lifetime of Debian 8 for a further five years under the Extended Long Term Support (ELTS) by paying some money.

Debian announces end of support for Jessie after five years

  • Debian announces end of support for Jessie after five years

    The Debian GNU/Linux project has announced that its distribution known as Jessie or version 8 has reached the end of its long-term support period on 30 June, five years after it was released on 26 April 2015.

    A statement from the project said there would be no further security updates for Jessie, though a small set of packages would be supported by external parties.

    Debian releases are named after characters from the film Toy Story. The current stable release is known as Buster or version 10.

    Debian spokeswoman Laura Arjona Reina said the LTS team would prepare the transition to Stretch or version 9 which is the old stable release.

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