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Linux-2.6.12 released

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Linux

Linus has released the 2.6.12 kernel, though no announcement has shown up yet. Quite a few fixes - but no substantial changes - have been merged since the last release candidate.

For those who might not remember back to last March: 2.6.12 contains, among other things, a driver for the "trusted computing" (TPM) chip found in Thinkpads (and elsewhere), SuperHyway bus support, a multilevel security implementation for SELinux, device mapper multipath support, the address space randomization patches, a restored Philips webcam driver (still lacking full functionality), full I/O barrier support for serial ATA drives, resource limits which can be used to allow unprivileged users to run tasks with realtime priority, and a huge pile of fixes.

See the long-format changelog for the details back to 2.6.12-rc2.

Source.

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