Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Upcoming SAVVY-V Open Source RISC-V Cluster Board Supports 10GbE via Microsemi PolarFire 64-bit RISC-V SoC

    RISC-V based PolarFire SoC FPGA by Microsemi may be coming up in the third quarter of this year, but Ali Uzel has been sharing a few details about SAVVY-V advanced open-source RISC-V cluster board made by FOSOH-V (Flexible Open SOurce Hardware for RISC-V) community of developers.

    It’s powered by Microsemi Polarfire RISC-V SoC MPFS250T with four 64-bit RISC-V cores, a smaller RV64IMAC monitor core, and FPGA fabric that allows 10GbE via SFP+ cages, and exposes six USB Type-C ports. The solution is called a cluster board since up to six SAVVY-V boards can be stacked via a PC/104+ connector and interfaced via the USB-C ports.

  • Some PSAs for NUC owners

    I’ve written before, in Contemplating the Cute Brick, that I’m a big fan of Intel’s NUC line of small-form-factor computers. Over the last week I’ve been having some unpleasant learning experiences around them. I’m still a fan, but I’m shipping this post where the search engines can see it in support of future NUC owners in trouble.

    Two years ago I bought an NUC for my wife Cathy to replace her last tower-case PC – the NUC8i3BEH1. This model was semi-obsolete even then, but I didn’t want one of the newer i5 or i7 NUCs because I didn’t think it would fit my wife’s needs as well.

    What my wife does with her computer doesn’t tax it much. Web browsing, office work, a bit of gaming that does not extend to recent AAA titles demanding the latest whizzy graphics card. I thought her needs would be best served by a small, quiet, low-power-consumption machine that was cheap enough to be considered readily disposable at the end of its service life. The exact opposite of my Great Beast…

    The NUC was an experiment that made Cathy and me happy. She especially likes the fact that it’s small and light enough to be mounted on the back of her monitor, so it effectively takes up no desk space or floor area in her rather crowded office. I like the NUC’s industrial design and engineering – lots of nice little details like the four case screws being captive to the baseplate so you cannot lose them during disassembly.

    Also. Dammit, NUCs are pretty. I say dammit because I feel like this shouldn’t matter to me and am a bit embarrassed to discover that it does. I like the color and shape and feel of these devices. Someone did an amazing job of making them unobtrusively attractive.

    [...]

    When I asked if Simply NUC knew of a source for a fan that would fit my 8i3BEH1 – a reasonable question, I think, to ask a company that loudly claims to be a one-stop shop for all NUC needs – the reply email told me I’d have to do “personal research” on that.

    It turns out that if the useless drone who was Simply NUC “service” had cared about doing his actual job, he could have the read the fan’s model number off the image I had sent him into a search box and found multiple sources within seconds, because that’s what I then did. Of course this would have required caring that a customer was unhappy, which apparently they don’t do at Simply NUC.

    Third reason I know this: My request for a refund didn’t even get refused; it wasn’t even answered.

  • GNU Binutils 2.35 Preparing For Release

    Binutils 2.35 was branched this weekend as this important component to the open-source Linux ecosystem.

    Binutils 2.35 has been branched meaning feature development is over for this next version of this collection of GNU tools.

    GNU Binutils 2.356 drops x86 Native Client (NaCl) support with Google having deprecated it in favor of WebAssembly, new options added for the readelf tool, many bug fixes, and an assortment of other changes albeit mostly on the minor side.

  • Using CPU Subsets for Building Software

    NetBSD has a somewhat obscure tool named psrset that allows creating “sets” of cores and running tasks on one of those sets. Let’s try it: [...]

  • What a TLS self signed certificate is at a mechanical level

    To simplify a lot, a TLS certificate is a bundle of attributes wrapped around a public key. All TLS certificates are signed by someone; we call this the issuer. The issuer for a certificate is identified by their X.509 Subject Name, and also at least implicitly by the keypair used to sign the certificate (since only an issuer TLS certificate with the right public key can validate the signature).

  • Security Researchers Attacked Google’s Mysterious Fuchsia OS: Here’s What They Found

    A couple of things that Computer Business Review has widely covered are important context for the security probe. (These won’t be much surprise to Fuchsia’s followers of the past two years.)

    i.e. Fuschsia OS is based on a tiny custom kernel from Google called Zircon which has some elements written in C++, some in Rust. Device drivers run in what’s called “user mode” or “user land”, meaning they’re not given fully elevated privileges. This means they can be isolated better.

    In user land, everything that a driver does has to go via the kernel first before hitting the actually computer’s resources. As Quark Labs found, this is a tidy way of reducing attack surface. But with some sustained attention, its researchers managed to get what they wanted: “We are able to gain kernel code execution from a regular userland process.”

  • What have you been playing on Linux? Come and have a chat

    Ah Sunday, that special day that's a calm before the storm of another week and a time for a community chat here on GOL. Today, it's our birthday! If you didn't see the post earlier this week, GamingOnLinux as of today has hit the big 11 years old! Oh how time sure flies by.

    Onto the subject of gaming on Linux: honestly, the majority of my personal game time has been taken up by Into the Breach. It's so gorgeously streamlined, accessible, fun and it's also ridiculously complex at the same time. Tiny maps that require a huge amount of forward thinking, as you weigh up each movement decision against any possible downsides. It's like playing chess, only with big mecha fighting off aliens trying to take down buildings.

    [...]

    I've also been quite disappointed in Crayta on Stadia, as it so far hasn't lived up to even my smallest expectations for the game maker. It just seems so half-baked, with poor/stiff animations and a lack of any meaningful content to start with. I'll be checking back on it in a few months but for now it's just not fun.

More in Tux Machines

Optimised authentication methods for Ubuntu Desktop

Still counting on passwords to protect your workstation? When set up properly, alternatives to passwords provide a streamlined user experience while significantly improving security. These alternative authentication methods can also easily be combined to create a custom and adaptive authentication profile. This whitepaper introduces three popular authentication methods that provide a solid alternative to passwords. Perhaps you’d like to configure your laptop for login using a YubiKey hardware token connected to a dock. Another option could be to login with a Duo push notification when not connected to the dock, but use a Google Authenticator one-time password when no network is available. Maybe you need a separate hardware token just for ssh authentication, and you always need to keep a long, complex password for emergency authentication should all other methods fail. All of these scenarios can be easily configured within Ubuntu. Read more

Open Hardware: Arduino, RISC-V and 96Boards

  • Arduino-controlled robot arm is ready to play you in a game of chess

    If you’re tired of playing chess on a screen, then perhaps you could create a robotic opponent like Instructables user Michalsky. The augmented board runs micro-Max source code, enabling chess logic to be executed on an Arduino Mega with room for control functions for a 6DOF robotic arm. The setup uses magnetic pieces, allowing it to pick up human moves via an array of 64 reed switches underneath, along with a couple shift registers. The Mega powers the robot arm accordingly, lifting the appropriate piece and placing it on the correct square.

  • New RISC-V CTO On Open Source Chip Architecture’s Global Data Center Momentum

    With more big international players on board, the foundation's new head of technology sees signs of "state of the art moving forward."

  • Snapdragon 410 based 96Boards CE SBC gets an upgrade

    Geniatech has launched a Linux-ready, $109 “Developer Board 4 V3” compliant with 96Boards CE that offers a Snapdragon 410E, GbE, 3x USB, 802.11ac, GPS, and-25 to 70°C support. Geniatech has released a V3 edition of its 96Boards CE form-factor Developer Board 4 SBC, the third update of the Development Board IV we covered back in 2016. Starting at $109, the Developer Board 4 V3 still runs Linux, Android, and Windows 10 IoT Core on Qualcomm’s 1.2GHz, quad -A53 Snapdragon 410m, although it has been upgraded to the 10-year availability Snapdragon 410E. Geniatech also sells a line of Rockchip based SBCs, among other embedded products.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack and Linux Headlines

  • LHS Episode #360: Zapped

    Welcome to the 360th episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topic show, the hosts discuss 1.2GHz distance records, a hybrid antenna for geosynchronous satellite operation, data mode identification for your smart phone, being pwned, Ubuntu 20.04.1, LibreOffice, HamClock and much more. Thanks for listening and hope you have a great week.

  • LHS Episode #361: The Weekender LIV

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • 2020-08-14 | Linux Headlines

    Google could be extending its Firefox search royalty deal, PyPy leaves the Software Freedom Conservancy, Ubuntu puts out a call for testing, Linspire removes snapd support, Microsoft showcases its open source contributions, and Facebook joins The Linux Foundation.

Python Programming

  • Django Weblog: DjangoCon Australia 2020: Schedule live and tickets on sale

    The 8th DjangoCon AU was scheduled to be run in Adelaide, South Australia this year. It's been moved to an online event and will take place on September 4th. DjangoCon AU is organized as a specialist track as part of PyConline AU. The schedule — though shorter than in previous years — is packed with talks about best practices, communities, contributions, and the present and future of Django. Since the event was due to run in Adelaide, the event is running in Australian Central Standard Time, UTC+9:30, and DjangoCon AU will start at 3:45pm ACST. This link shows when the DjangoCon AU Opening address starts for all the DjangoCon timezones..

  • Return how many times each letter shows up in the string by using an asterisk (*)

    Hello people, in this article we will solve the below python problem. You receive the name of a city as a string, and you need to return a string that shows how many times each letter shows up in the string by using an asterisk (*).

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #22: Create Cross-Platform Python GUI Apps With BeeWare

    Do you want to distribute your Python applications to other users who don't have or even use Python? Maybe you're interested in seeing your Python application run on iOS or Android mobile devices. This week on the show we have Russell Keith-Magee, the founder and maintainer of the BeeWare project. Russell talks about Briefcase, a tool that converts a Python application into native installers on macOS, Windows, Linux, and mobile devices.

  • Python vs R: Which is Good for Machine Learning?

    If you want to build a machine learning project and are stuck between choosing the right programming language to build it, you know you have come to the right place. This blog will not only help you understand the difference between the two languages namely: Python and R; but also help you know which language has an edge over one another in multiple aspects. So without wasting a single moment, let’s dive into it!

  • Freezegun - Real Joy for Fake Dates in Python

    If you've ever tested code involving dates and times in Python you've probably had to mock the datetime module. And if you've mocked the datetime module, at some point it probably mocked you back when your tests failed.

  • Mastering the SQLite Database in Python

    In this tutorial, we shall see some advanced tasks associated with the SQLite database from Python. We shall see topics such as inserting images, Listing the tables, Backup a database, Dumping Rollback in SQLite, Deleting records from a table, Dropping a table, SQLite database exceptions, and more.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Week 6 Blog Post
  • Top 10 Important Uses cases of Python in the Real World

    These top 10 Python uses cases in the real world prove how effective the programming language is. Read the real life uses of Python and implement it in your organization.