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CutiePi tablet based on Raspberry Pi CM3+ starts at $169

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

On Kickstarter: a $169 and up, open source “CutiePi” tablet that runs a Linux- and Qt-based stack on a quad-core, 1.2GHz Raspberry Pi CM3+ Lite. You also get an 8-inch, 1280 x 800 touchsceen, a 5000mAh battery, and USB and micro-HDMI ports.

Taiwanese startup CutiePi, Which has been teasing details about its Raspberry Pi Compute Module based CutiePi tablet since last August, will go live on Kickstarter on Tuesday. The 8-inch tablet starts at a super early bird price of $169 and features a CutiePi UI shell based on Qt and Raspberry Pi OS (the latest version of Raspbian). The tablet is OSHWA-certified for open source hardware compliance and will also be available in a PCB-only package.

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CutiePi Raspberry Pi CM3+ Lite based Tablet Launched on Kickstar

CutiePi Is World’s Thinnest, Hackable Raspberry Pi Tablet

  • CutiePi Is World’s Thinnest, Hackable Raspberry Pi Tablet, Available for Pre-Order Now

    CutiePi tablet was launched today on Kickstarter as the world’s thinnest Raspberry Pi tablet that promises to be fully open source, ultra portable, and incredibly intuitive.

    Dubbed by its creator as the “first truly usable Raspberry Pi tablet,” CutiePi is powered by a custom, OSHWA-certified open source board based on Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3+ Lite with 1GB RAM, which uses the same BCM2837 SoC as the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ single-board computer.

CutiePi is an open source and portable Raspberry Pi tablet

  • CutiePi is an open source and portable Raspberry Pi tablet

    The Raspberry Pi opened up a whole new world of DIY projects but it has ironically been more difficult to actually produce a “normal” RPi-powered computer that doesn’t look like a Frankensteined contraption. There are, of course, some kits that let you easily assemble a Raspberry Pi desktop, laptop, or even tablet, but those look more like things you’d rather leave at home than be caught dead using it outside. It’s for that exact use case that CutiePi was born and now the ready-to-use RPi Tablet has launched on Kickstarter to bring all that to everyone willing to take the risk.

CutiePi: Raspberry Pi Projects on the Go

  • CutiePi: Raspberry Pi Projects on the Go

    A portable Raspberry Pi is something of a dream that most Pi enthusiasts would desire. The power and availability of the Pi with none of the wires and mess. The latest to attempt this lofty goal is the CutiePi tablet, currently seeking funding via Kickstarter.

    [...]

    Measuring 213 mm x 176.6 x 12mm (8.38 x 6.95 x 0.47 inch) the tablet comes with an 8 inch IPS touch screen at 1280 x 800 resolution. An internal 5000 mAh Li-Po battery provides power to the tablet, and can be charged via a USB C charger. Wireless connectivity is via 802.11 b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0. A built in 5 megapixel camera can be used for projects and webcam duties.

    A big disappointment is the GPIO, there is a distinct lack of GPIO access. Of the 120 GPIO pins available to the Compute Module , only six are available via a breakout connector.

    CutiePi can be used on the go and comes with a handle that doubles as a stand. It can also be used as a “sidekick” when plugged into an external monitor. This will trigger CutiePi to act as a virtual keyboard and trackpad.

    CutiePi is compatible with Raspberry Pi OS and comes with its own CutiePi shell, a tablet friendly skin for the operating system.

CutiePi Sidekick mode: Linux tablet is also a controller

  • CutiePi Sidekick mode: Linux tablet is also a controller for external displays

    The CutiePi is a Linux tablet with a built-in handle, a custom user interface, and a Raspberry Pi single-board computer at its heart.

    Set to begin shipping in November, the CutiePi is up for pre-order through a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign. And now that the campaign has surpassed its original $35,000 goal, the developer has started promising “stretch goal” features.

    One of those is a new Sidekick mode that lets you use the tablet as a controller when you connect it to an external display.

CutiePi: Ultra-Portable, Open-Source Raspberry Pi Tablet

  • CutiePi: Ultra-Portable, Open-Source Raspberry Pi Tablet

    CutiePi: Ultra-Portable, Open-Source Raspberry Pi Tablet

    CutiePi, the world’s thinnest Raspberry Pi-based tablet by the Taiwanese startup CutiePi is creating enough buzz in the market. 100% open source, CutiePi is just 12mm thick.

Meet CutiePi

  • [Older] Meet CutiePi: A 100% Open Source And Ultra-Portable Raspberry Pi Tablet

    If you have ever used the most popular single-board computer, Raspberry Pi (RPi), you probably know that you need to carry along additional peripherals to use RPi. So, if you want an all-in-one device that not only leverages the power of Raspberry Pi but is also convenient to use anywhere, CutiePie is right here for you.

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