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IBM/Red Hat: Sysadmins, Success Stories, Apache Kafka and IBM "AI" Marketing/Hype

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Red Hat
  • Sysadmin stories from the trenches: Funny user mistakes

    I was a noob IT guy in the late 90s. I provided desktop support to a group of users who were, shall we say, not the most technical of users. I sometimes wonder where those users are today, and I silently salute the staff that's had to support them since I left long ago.

    I suffered many indignities during that time. I can chuckle about the situations now.

  • Sneak peek: Podman's new REST API

    This one is just between you and me, don't tell anyone else! Promise? Okay, I have your word, so here goes: There's a brand new REST API that is included with version 2.0 of Podman! That release has just hit testing on the Fedora Project and may have reached stable by the time this post is published. With this new REST API, you can call Podman from platforms such as cURL, Postman, Google's Advanced REST client, and many others. I'm going to describe how to begin using this new API.

    The Podman service only runs on Linux. You must do some setup on Linux to get things going.

  • Red Hat Success Stories: Creating a foundation for a containerized future

    Wondering how Red Hat is helping its customers succeed? We regularly publish customer success stories that highlight how we're helping customers gain efficiency, cut costs, and transform the way they deliver software. This month we'll look at how Slovenská sporiteľňa and Bayport Financial Services have worked with Red Hat to improve their business.

  • Apache Kafka and Kubernetes is making real time processing in payments a bit easier

    The introduction of the real time payments network in the United States has presented an unique opportunity for organizations to revisit their messaging infrastructure. The primary goal of real time payments is to support real time processing, but a secondary goal is to reduce the toil of the ongoing operations and make real time ubiquitous across the organization.

    Traditional message systems, have been around for quite some time, but have been a bit clunky to operate. Many times, tasks such as software upgrades and routine patches meant the messaging infrastructure would be down while the update was performed, causing delays in payment processing.This may have been reasonable in a world where payment processing was not expected outside of normal banking hours, but in our always-on digital world, customers expect their payments to clear and settle in real time. Today, outages and delays disrupt both business processes and customer experience.

  • IBM and LFAI move forward on trustworthy and responsible AI

    For over a century, IBM has created technologies that profoundly changed how humans work and live: the personal computer, ATM, magnetic tape, Fortran Programming Language, floppy disk, scanning tunneling microscope, relational database, and most recently, quantum computing, to name a few. With trust as one of our core principles, we’ve spent the past century creating products our clients can trust and depend on, guiding their responsible adoption and use, and respecting the needs and values of all users and communities we serve.

    Our current work in artificial intelligence (AI) is bringing a transformation of similar scale to the world today. We infuse these guiding principles of trust and transparency into all of our work in AI. Our responsibility is to not only make the technical breakthroughs required to make AI trustworthy and ethical, but to ensure these trusted algorithms work as intended in real-world AI deployments.

  • IBM donates "Trusted AI" projects to Linux Foundation AI

    IBM on Monday announced it's donating a series of open-source toolkits designed to help build trusted AI to a Linux Foundation project, the LF AI Foundation. As real-world AI deployments increase, IBM says the contributions can help ensure they're fair, secure and trustworthy.

    "Donation of these projects to LFAI will further the mission of creating responsible AI-powered technologies and enable the larger community to come forward and co-create these tools under the governance of Linux Foundation," IBM said in a blog post, penned by Todd Moore, Sriram Raghavan and Aleksandra Mojsilovic.

  • IBM donates AI toolkits to Linux Foundation to ‘mitigate bias’ in datasets

    As artificial intelligence (AI) deployments increase around the world, IBM says it’s determined to ensure that they’re fair, secure and trustworthy.

    To that end, it has donated a series of open-source toolkits designed to help build trusted AI to a Linux Foundation project, the LF AI Foundation, as reported in ZDNet.

    “Donation of these projects to LFAI will further the mission of creating responsible AI-powered technologies and enable the larger community to come forward and co-create these tools under the governance of Linux Foundation,” IBM said in a blog post, penned by Todd Moore, Sriram Raghavan and Aleksandra Mojsilovic.

  • PionerasDev wins IBM Open Source Community Grant to increase women’s participation in programming

    Last fall, IBM’s open source community announced a new quarterly grant to award nonprofit organizations that are dedicated to education, inclusiveness, and skill-building for women, underrepresented minorities, and underserved communities in the open source world. The Open Source Community Grant aims to help create new tech opportunities for underrepresented communities and foster the adoption and use of open source.

  • Ansible 101 live streaming series - a retrospective

    That last metric can be broken down further: on average, I spent 3.5 hours prepping for each live stream, 1 hour doing the live stream, and then 1 hour doing post-production (setting chapter markers, reading chat messages, downloading the recording, etc.).

    So each video averaged $30 in ad revenue, and by ad revenue alone, the total hourly wage equivalent based on direct video revenue is... $5.45/hour.

    Subtract the cost of the equipment I use for the streaming (~$1,000, most of it used, though I already owned it), and now I'm a bit in the hole!

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Schedule for Wednesday's FESCo Meeting (2020-07-08)

    F33 System-Wide Change: Make nano the default editor https://pagure.io/fesco/issue/2426 APPROVED (+8, 0, -0)

  • Fedora Approves Of Making Nano The Default Terminal Text Editor, Other Features Accepted

    At this week's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting, more features were approved for the Fedora 33 release due out this fall. Most notable is the change of the default terminal text editor with Fedora 33 but other changes were also accepted. Highlights of this week's FESCo decisions include: - The change to make nano the default text editor was approved. Nano will be the new default over Vi.

  • Ingenic X2000 IoT Application Processor Combines 32-bit MIPS Xburst 2 Cores with Xburst 0 Real-time Core

    The company can provide a complete software and hardware development kit with a Linux 4.4 BSP and Halley5 development board with an X2000 SoM with a wireless module fitted to a largish carrier board with Ethernet, USB, microphone, MicroSD card slot, I/O header, buttons and so on. The other side of the board is equipped with a dual-camera board and a Full HD AMOLED display.

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  • Linux 5.9 Will Finally Offer Proper Support For The ThinkPad 10 Ultrabook Keyboard

    While Lenovo recently committed to certifying more systems for Linux use and upstreaming drivers / hardware support for Linux moving forward, there remains a backlog of existing Lenovo devices that still have less than desire Linux support. But thanks to Red Hat and others, the hardware support does continue advancing.  The Lenovo ThinkPad 10 Ultrabook initially debuted in 2014 and now with Linux 5.9 debuting in late 2020 there is proper keyboard support, thanks to Red Hat's Hans de Goede who has frequently provided similar driver improvements for a range of hardware over the years. 

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #177

    Ubuntu 20.04 Released https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2020/04/download-ubuntu-20-04 Ubuntu Survey Results https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-20-04-survey-results Fedora 32 Released https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-fedora-32/ Lenovo Now Shipping Fedora on Thinkpads https://fedoramagazine.org/coming-soon-fedora-on-lenovo-laptops/ Manjaro 20 Released https://forum.manjaro.org/t/manjaro-20-0-lysia-released/138633 Bug In Git May Leak Credentials https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Git-Newline-Leak-Vulnerability Linux Kernel 5.7 rc4 Out https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/5/3/306 Linux Kernel 5.5 Is Now End of Life http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/2004.2/07196.html Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Out https://www.redhat.com/archives/rhelv6-list/2020-April/msg00000.html Parrot 4.9 Out https://parrotsec.org/blog/parrot-4.9-release-notes/ IPFire 2.25 Core Update 143 Out https://blog.ipfire.org/post/ipfire-2-25-core-update-143-released Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.6 Out https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Changelog-6.1 LibreOffice 6.4.3 Out https://blog.documentfoundation.org/blog/2020/04/16/libreoffice-6-4-3/ Proton 5.0-6 Out https://www.gamingonlinux.com/articles/steam-play-proton-50-6-is-out-to-help-doom-eternal-rockstar-launcher-and-more-on-linux.16442 VLC 3.0.10 Out https://www.videolan.org/vlc/releases/3.0.10.html Darktable 3.0.2 Out https://www.darktable.org/2020/04/darktable-302-released/ OpenSUSE Tumbleweed for AWS Marketplace Out https://9to5linux.com/opensuse-tumbleweed-is-now-available-on-aws-marketplace KDE 20.04 Applications Out https://9to5linux.com/kde-applications-20-04-officially-released-this-is-whats-new Credits: Ubuntu “Complete” sound: Canonical Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust

GNUnet 0.13.1 released

This is a bugfix release for gnunet and gnunet-gtk specifically. For gnunet, no changes to the source have been made. However, the default configuration had to be modified to support the changes made in 0.13.0. For gnunet-gtk, this fixes a more serious issue where the 0.13.0 tarball failed to build. Read more

Intel DG1 Graphics Card Bring-Up On Linux Continues - Latest Bits For Local Memory

Recently there have been a lot of open-source Linux patches flowing concerning Intel's bring-up of their DG1 discrete graphics card for developers. That work continued this week with the latest patches in wiring up LMEM support. Among the recent Intel DG1 patches for Linux recently have been on the media driver front, compute runtime with OpenCL and Level Zero and as part of that the IGC support, and then most importantly the necessary Linux kernel changes building off the existing Gen12/Xe graphics support. Read more Also: Intel AMX Support Lands In The GNU Assembler

Programming: GStreamer, Drat, RasPi, Python