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A Host For Native Linux VST Plugins ?

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Software

Fully functional support for the VST plugin standard is one of the most important remaining problems for the Linux audio world. VST plugins are ubiquitous in the Win/Mac audio worlds, they are employed extensively in professional and desktop music software, and it may be no exaggeration to claim that the VST standard has revolutionized computer-based creation of music and sound.

Given its great popularity this writer believes that stable VST support would give Windows users a compelling reason to try Linux as an alternate or replacement platform, especially if they have a sizeable investment of money and experience in their collection of VST plugins.

To a degree, VST support under Linux already exists. The FST and DSSI projects provide utilities to open and run Windows-specific VST plugins. Those projects do work, but they are dependent on WINE. As WINE itself has become a more stable dependency the FST and DSSI bridges have become viable mechanisms for internal VST support in programs such as Ardour and Rosegarden. However, significant problems remain, particularly regarding multiple plugin instances and MIDI control.

Developer Lucio Asnaghi has created his JOST software to provide seamless support for VST plugins under Linux.

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