Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Wine 5.10

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.10 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - More progress on the WineD3D Vulkan backend.
      - Beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL.
      - Better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers.
      - More glyph substitutions in DirectWrite.
      - Support for DSS private keys.
      - ARM64 exception handling fixes.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.10.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.10 Starts Work On A Unix Library For NTDLL, More WineD3D Vulkan

    Wine 5.10 is out as the latest bi-weekly development release of this open-source project for allowing Windows games and applications to run generally gracefully on Linux (and other) platforms.

    Wine 5.10 continues the recent trend of bringing up the Vulkan back-end for WineD3D for this Direct3D 9/10/11 implementation to allow it to run atop Vulkan rather than needing to map it over OpenGL. With Wine 5.10 more functionality is in place but doesn't appear to be good yet for gamers compared to the OpenGL code-path or most notably the out-of-tree DXVK project providing great Direct3D 9/10/11 support over Vulkan and is what is notably used at the moment by Steam Play (Proton).

  • Wine 5.10 out with more WineD3D Vulkan work and anti-cheat improvements

    Alexandre Julliard, CodeWeavers staffer and Wine hacker today announced the Wine 5.10 development release with some more exciting work.

    They've continued progressing Vulkan support for WineD3D, there's the beginnings of a separate Unix library for NTDLL, more glyph substitutions in DirectWrite, support for DSS private keys, ARM64 fixes and other various bug fixes included.

    Something bigger came with Wine 5.10 though too, as they also mentioned it has better support for anti-cheat kernel drivers. That's going to be the big one if it's possible to get working properly. Anti-cheat as a whole is the Achilles heel of Wine (and so Steam Play Proton too), as it's often the cause of Windows games being unable to work on Linux through the compatibility layer so it's pleasing to know more work is going on.

Wine Staging 5.10 Adds Another Patch For Denuvo

  • Wine Staging 5.10 Adds Another Patch For Denuvo + A Fix For Numerous D3D11 Games

    Wine Staging 5.10 is out today as the latest version of this experimental blend of Wine that is re-based off yesterday's Wine 5.10 codebase.

    Wine Staging 5.10 isn't the most exciting release in recent times but there are two new patches added:

    - RtlQueryRegistryValuesEx has been implemented in addressing a one year old bug report for some WDM kernel drivers needing this function. This patch is useful for the Denuvo anti-cheat software for games as well as the WibuKey digital content protection software.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Understanding Copyleft

The concept of copyleft means making a software program or other work free to use and additionally requiring all modified and extended versions of that program to be free as well. It’s important to note that “free” in this sense refers to freedom – not cost – and you may hear the commonly used phrases “free as in speech” and “free as in beer” used to make this distinction. According to the LINFO website, “the origin of the term copyleft is not certain. It may have first appeared in a message contained in Tiny BASIC, a free version of the Basic programming language that was written by Dr. Li Chen Wang in the late 1970s.” [...] As Joe Casad states in a Linux Magazine article, “The GNU General Public License was born of the simple idea that freedom matters. Yet this simple tool for protecting freedom has another important feature that makes it even more powerful, and that is the ability to build communities.” The amazing growth of projects and communities that make up the open source ecosystem stems in part from this ability to modify and extend tools to meet changing needs. Read more

Arcade shooter with a massive skill tree 'BYTEPATH' goes open source

A few years after release, adnzzzzZ has released the source code for their crazy skill-tree arcade shooter BYTEPATH. "Expect BYTEPATH to be a mix of Bit Blaster XL and Path of Exile, created with the intention of expanding Bit Blaster XL's relaxing and addictive gameplay with Path of Exile's build depth, build diversity and RPG elements." Now available under the MIT license, it's another good look into how indie games get made and a good starting point for those looking to see a properly finished game. Not only that, it can now live on with community fixes and continue working far into the future. Read more

Android Leftovers