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Linux email client Geary is getting a responsive (phone-friendly) UI

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Software

I’m a big fan of desktop e-mail client Geary — it’s in our list of the best Ubuntu apps after all — so I’m particularly thrilled to hear that a “mobile version” is in the works.

Okay, okay: I say “mobile version” but what I more accurately mean is a mobile “face” for the app.

Y’know: a responsive interface designed to work well on a range of mobile devices, be it Linux phones like the Librem 5 or upcoming Linux tablets like the PineTab.

Alex, aka BabyWogue, uncovered work on an adaptive UI for Geary in code on the Geary repo on the Purism Gitlab instance. He built it and, as you’d expect, demoes the current state of progress in a video on his YouTube channel (which you can see embedded below).

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