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today's leftovers

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  • Finally Landed on Planet GNOME

    Should I start with a deep introduction? Not sure! Okay, let me start from my first time with Linux. I installed my first Linux when I was around 17, It was OpenSUSE. I just burned iso and booted, HAHAHA It was a magnetic disk era. After some years I was getting deep into Linux. I consider Linux as an Icecream. Lots of flavors to eat. Eat whatever you like. Or make your own flavor. 4-5 years ago I was jumping over multiple distros. I tried multiple linux distros. But now I'm settled on a custom build Debian distro. My first encounter with GNOME was on Fedora. I still love Fedora. But Debian is ultra-fast with only selected packages and easy to make its flavor. This is my short Linux story.

  • Sound Recorder to modern HIG I

    I'm back, reporting here what's done so far. I decided to post about every change in sound recorder I'm working on but most of the work was behind a scene. I mean no UI change.

    But now new changes noticeable to end-users.

    I'm also writing this development blog cause, I don't wanna give chance to other people to spread some false information about development around (Social Media, YouTube).

    If you are reading this and you are working on any GNOME project, Please take 5-6 min and write about it frequently.

    As I told I'm working on GNOME Sound Recorder, recently I changed many things in the application.

  • LibreOffice Tuesday T&T: Impress Presenter Screen

    LibreOffice Impress is a valuable presentation software, with plenty of advanced features. One of the most liked by skilled presenters is the so called Presentation Screen, which shows the current and the next slide on screen, and the notes. It helps the presenter to maintain the rythm of the presentation, and to remember the details of the talk.

    According to LibreOffice default configuration, the Presenter Screen shows only if the PC is connected to two displays. For some people this is a feature, for some others this is a bug.

  • PeaZip 7.3.1

    PeaZip is an open source file and archive manager. It's freeware and free of charge for any use. PeaZip can extract most of archive formats both from Windows and Unix worlds, ranging from mainstream 7Z, RAR, TAR and ZIP to experimental ones like PAQ/LPAQ family, currently the most powerful compressor available.

  • How CHAOSS Measures Open Source Community Health

    To learn more about the project, we spoke with Dawn Foster, Director of Open Source Community Strategy at VMware and member of the CHAOSS governing board.

    FOSSlife: Please give our readers a bit of background on the CHAOSS project. How did it originate and what are its goals?

    Dawn Foster: The community was formed as a result of a Birds of a Feather at the Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit in 2017 out of a shared desire to collaborate on ways to measure open source project health. It was officially announced as a Linux Foundation project a few months later at the LF Open Source Summit North America. The idea was to bring together several different analytics tools, like GrimoireLab and cregit, into a coordinated effort while also developing metrics definitions that could be used by any implementation.

    [...]

    Dawn Foster: Anyone can participate in the CHAOSS project! I think sometimes people think that CHAOSS is all about software development on the tools we use to gather the metrics, and while that's an important part of what we do, it isn't everything. Most of the time, the working groups are discussing and defining metrics, which is something anyone can do.

    We collaboratively work together in documents to define metrics to better understand what questions they answer and why they are important in addition to talking about what data you might need to collect. In some cases, like with many of the diversity and inclusion metrics, qualitative measurements are an important element of the metrics definitions. We need people from all backgrounds with different skills to help us define metrics in a way that is useful for a variety of people and organizations.

    In addition to the metrics, CHAOSS is a fun community of smart and welcoming people, so it's a place where you can enjoy contributing!

  • NVIDIA K8s Device Plugin for Wind River Linux

    The advent of containers has changed the way computational workloads are managed and orchestrated in modern computing environments. Given the paradigm shift towards the microservices, container orchestration has become of critical importance in today’s distributed and cloud systems [1].

    Managing edge devices on the scale of hundreds and thousands is an onerous task. Fortunately, orchestrators such as Kubernetes take the complexity out of updates, roll-backs, and more in a platform-agnostic environment. [2]. Orchestrators provide the means to manage heterogeneous edge clusters. It is necessary to not only orchestrate containers but to discover the hardware specialized devices that the containers and orchestrator can leverage. Failing to manage these resources can lead to inefficiency, time drain, concurrency issues, and more.

More in Tux Machines

Proton GE compatibility layer has a big new release up

Proton GE, the community-built fork of the Proton compatibility layer for Linux has a big new release out. Need a quick reminder? Wine is a compatibility layer that can help to run Windows apps and games on Linux. Valve have their own version called Proton which is included with the Linux Steam Client in Steam Play, and Proton GE is a special version of it built by user "GloriousEggroll". Why use it? You might find certain games need adjustments not currently in the official Proton and Proton GE can make them run "out of the box". Proton-5.9-GE-3-ST is the brand new release aimed to now be the stable Proton GE release. It pulls in tons of fixes to help various Windows games run on Linux including GTA V, Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes, Planet Zoo, Jurassic World: Evolution, Origin client fixes and much more. Read more

COVID-19 has not stalled Linux development

Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel have been telling anyone who will listen that while COVID-19 has slowed down many technologies, while speeding up other tech developments, it hasn't affected Linux development much at all. Torvalds said that none of his co-developers have been hugely impacted either. “I was worried for a while because one of our developers was offline for a month or two.... [But,] it turned out that it was just RSI [repetitive strain injury], and RSI is kind of an occupational hazard to deal with." He added. "One of the things that is so interesting about the Linux community is how much it has always been email-based and remote, how rarely we get together in person.." Torvalds took time out to praise his new AMD Threadripper 3970x-based processor-powered developer desktop. Torvalds later added that, although he had been concerned about its fan noise it actually works well for him. Torvalds moved to this new homebrew computer because he needed the speed. Read more

today's howtos

Meet RecApp, a New Screen Recording App for Linux Desktop

RecApp is a simple open-source screen recorder tool. It doesn’t boast of huge features but gives you enough to record your screen with a simple user interface. We have plenty of screen recorders available for Linux. Abhishek prefers to use Kazam while I like using SimpleScreenrecorder. Neither of us use the GNOME’s built-in screen recorder. Recently we were contacted by the developer of RecApp, a new screen recording tool. Since I like experimenting with different applications, I took it upon myself to cover RecApp as this week’s open source software highlight. Read more