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Debian: SReview, Nageru, Clang build and More

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Debian
  • Wouter Verhelst: SReview 0.6

    I had planned to release a new version of SReview, my online video review and transcoding system that I wrote originally for FOSDEM but is being used for DebConf, too, after it was set up and running properly for FOSDEM 2020. However, things got a bit busy (both in my personal life and in the world at large), so it fell a bit by the wayside.

    I've now also been working on things a bit more, in preparation for an improved administrator's interface, and have started implementing a REST API to deal with talks etc through HTTP calls. This seems to be coming along nicely, thanks to OpenAPI and the Mojolicious plugin for parsing that. I can now design the API nicely, and autogenerate client side libraries to call them.

    While at it, because libmojolicious-plugin-openapi-perl isn't available in Debian 10 "buster", I moved the docker containers over from stable to testing. This revealed that both bs1770gain and inkscape changed their command line incompatibly, resulting in me having to work around those incompatibilities. The good news is that I managed to do so in a way that keeps running SReview on Debian 10 viable, provided one installs Mojolicious::Plugin::OpenAPI from CPAN rather than from a Debian package. Or installs a backport of that package, of course. Or, heck, uses the Docker containers in a kubernetes environment or some such -- I'd love to see someone use that in production.

  • Nageru 2.0.0 released

    I've released version 2.0.0 of Nageru, my live video mixer. Obviously, version 2 of anything is a major milestone; in this case, it wasn't so much this specific release being so big, but the combined work that has gone on through the 1.x versions. (Also, if you go from 1.9.0 to 1.10.0, you can be pretty sure 2.0 is never coming!) There were several major features where I could probably have justified a 2.0 bump alone (e.g., the multichannel audio processing support, HTML5 graphics, slow motion through Futatabi, or the large reworking of the themes in 1.9.0), and now, it was time. Interestingly enough, despite growing by 40,000 lines or so since the 1.0.0 release four and a half years ago, the basic design has proved fairly robust; there are always things I would like to do different, but I'm fairly happy about how flexible and reliable things have turned out to be, even though my own use cases have shifted from simple conference video to complex sports productions.

  • Debian rebuild with clang 10 + some patches

    Instead of patching clang itself, I used a different approach this time: patching Debian tools or implementing some workaround to mitigate an issue.

  • Olivier Berger: Mixing NRELab’s Antidote and Eclipse Che on the same k8s cluster

    You may have heard of my search for Cloud solutions to run labs in an academic context, with a focus on free an open source solutions . You may read previous installments of this blog, or for a shorter, check the presentation I’ve recorded last week.

    I’ve become quite interested, in the latest month, in 2 projects: NRELab’s Antidote and Eclipse Che.

    Antidote is the software that powers NRELabs, a labs platform for learning network automation, which runs on top of Kubernetes (k8s). The interesting thing is that for each learner, there can be a dedicated k8s namespace with multiple virtual nodes running on a separate network. This can be used in the context of virtual classes/labs where our students will perform network labs in parallel on the same cluster.

  • Olivier Berger: Experimenting on distant labs and labs on the Cloud

    I mention tools like Guacamole, MeshCentral, NRELab’s Antidote, Eclipse Che and Labtainers, as well as k8s and Docker, as interesting tools that may allow us to continue teaching in labs while allowing more flexibility, distant learning, and hopefully improved quality.

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - May 2020

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In May, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 17.25h for LTS (out of 30 max; all done) and 9.25h for ELTS (out of 20 max; all done).

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