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KDE Development: Adriaan de Groot and New GSoC Students

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KDE
  • Timezones, yes please

    One of the bits of Calamares that I think is most terrible is the timezone selector. So I was very happy to read Volker’s ideas about timezone-mapping.

    Calamares is a universal Linux installer, used by some dozens of Linux distro’s. It is built as a framework, customizable by downstreams to their liking. This is basically a service to the small-distro Linux community, and PRs are very welcome .. but I digress.

    Part of installation is picking a timezone to put the system in. Calamares offers a map, and you click on it, and it picks a likely location, and off you go. The technology used is simple: there’s a PNG for each timezone (this sounds familiar). The user clicks on the PNG of the world map, and the mouse coordinates are mapped to a location (longitude and latitude), the location is mapped to a zone offset that gets mapped to a timezone image, and the image is drawn.

  • The Community Bonding Period Ends

    It has been almost a month, since the commencement of community bonding period and the phase was mostly good. I spent most of my time lurking over the IRC in passive reconnaissance mode, force of habit I mostly speak less and I know it is not a good one especially being part of an open-source community. I used to attend all the meetings and tried to get accustomed with the workflow of the community and got to know about everything hot and spicy that is taking place whether it is Krita finally on android or new contributors working on some bugs.

  • KDE Conference India 2020: A very late post

    KDE India Conference 2020 was successfully organized in Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology. It was a three-day event, from Jan 17 to Jan 19. There were talks about Libre, Open Source Software and how software is developed using C++ and the Qt Framework. Hands-on workshops were also organized on C++, Qt and QML which gave attendees a good start on how to start their journey with C++ and Qt Framework. The conference was able to educate 200+ attendees throughout the conference. Refreshments were provided to all present for the conference on all 3 days. Every day of the conference concluded with dinner at various good places in Delhi with all the speakers, organizers and volunteers.

  • About me, who am I?

    I am Shubham, a final year undergraduate student, pursuing B.E(Bachelor of Engineering) at BMS Institute of Technology and Management, Bangalore, India. I am an open source enthusiast and developer, mostly working with C++ with Qt framework. I also have decent knowledge of C, Java, Python, bash scripting, git and I love developing under linux environment. Previously I was selected as one of many GSoC students to be mentored by this amazing organization, which is KDE. This year also, I applied again to KDE as a student and was fortunate enough to get selected. I will be developing for Cantor project. Apart from coding, in my spare time I go for Cricket or Volleyball to keep myself refreshed.

  • Integrated Documentation in Cantor

    Cantor is an application that lets user use their favourite mathematicalapplications from within a nicely KDE-integrated worksheet interface. It offers assistant dialogs for common tasks and allows users to share their worksheets withothers. Cantor is one of many KDE educational projects. It supports a variety of backends, be it Maxima, Octave, Python, R and many more and that too packed in a single intuitive GUI. The current version of Cantor does not have support for viewing backend's documentation inside the application itself. For example, to view Maxima’s documentation or help, the application provides an external link pointing to the Maxima’s official documentation page which is opened in a fresh browser window. This has the obvious drawback of requiring an active internet connectivity.

Klinker library in KDE Connect Sms app

  • Klinker library in KDE Connect Sms app

    So today GSoC’s three months coding period officially begins. Last one month I spent bonding with my mentors and have tried to establish the prerequisites required for the rest of the project. My project for GSoC 2020 is to improve the MMS support to KDE Connect’s SMS app.
    During the community bonding period, the first challenge we had to face was to implement a way to send MMS messages from KDE Connect’s android app and it becomes more challenging when you will come to know that android’s MMS API’s are hidden and there is no documentation available for the same. This task alone becomes beyond the scope of a GSoC project.
    With the help of some luck, we found the Klinker library which is an opensource sm-mms library for android. I spent some time going through its implementation and after having the understanding of how it works, I started implementing it in KDE Connect and within two weeks I was able to send MMS messages through KDE Connect for the first time.
    I would say, It is a great library for third-party android developers who wants to implement similar functionality in their applications.

More KDE GSoC Students

  • Cantor during GSoC 2020

    Hello everyone! I'm participating in Google Summer of Code 2020, I am working on KDE Cantor project. The GSoC project is mentored by Alexander Semke - one of the core developers of LabPlot and Cantor.

  • The coding period starts! - GSoC 2020 with KDE and EteSync [Part 2]

    Hey everyone! The month-long Community Bonding period of GSoC ‘20 has ended, and with it begins the exciting phase of beginning work on our projects. My project, EteSync sync backend for Akonadi, will add support for syncing users’ contacts, calendars and tasks to Kontact. Here are the insights I’ve gained about the project, as well as my plans for the upcoming phase.

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 – Community bonding a bit about text annotation

    Community bonding period has ended and officially the coding period begins now. This is my second (and late) post and I will talk about one of my main objectives in this project, text annotation, but first a little introduction:

    In a supervised learning stage, data annotation is indispensable to machine learning models, so it can learn to recognize predetermined patterns and the algorithm can treat new, non-annotated data and successfully do its task. marK is a machine learning dataset annotation tool that aims to facilitate the important process of annotating data.

  • Week 0 – GSoC Project Report

    This week corresponds to week 2 of the planned timeline. I had planned to write tests and get started with the MVC classes for the storyboard docker this week. Also the comment menu from previous week was to be implemented.

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Security and DRM: CAs, Open Source Security Podcast, Reproducible Builds and Cars That Refuse to Work

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    However, several certificates can have the same keypair and X.509 Subject Name, provided that other attributes differ. One such attribute is the issuer that signed them (including whether this is a self-signed CA root certificate). So the first thing is that having more than one certificate for an issuer is generally required to get multiple chains. If you only have one certificate for each issuer, you can pretty much only build a single chain.

    There are three places that these additional certificates for an issuer can come from; they can be sent by the server, they can be built into your certificate store in advance, or they can be cached because you saw them in some other context. The last is especially common with browsers, which often cache intermediate certificates that they see and may use them in preference to the intermediate certificate that a TLS server sends. Other software is generally more static about what it will use. My guess is that we're unlikely to have multiple certificates for a single CA root issuer, at least for modern CAs and modern root certificate sets as used by browsers and so on. This implies that the most likely place to get additional issuer certificates is from intermediate certificates sent by a server.

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  • Security 101: Encryption, Hashing, and Encoding

    Encoding is a manner of transforming some data from one representation to another in a manner that can be reversed. This encoding can be used to make data pass through interfaces that restrict byte values (e.g., character sets), or allow data to be printed, or other transformations that allow data to be consumed by another system. Some of the most commonly known encodings include hexadecimal, Base 64, and URL Encoding. Reversing encoding results in the exact input given (i.e., is lossless), and can be done deterministically and requires no information other than the data itself. Lossless compression can be considered encoding in any format that results in an output that is smaller than the input. While encoding may make it so that the data is not trivially recognizable by a human, it offers no security properties whatsoever. It does not protect data against unauthorized access, it does not make it difficult to be modified, and it does not hide its meaning. Base 64 encoding is commonly used to make arbitrary binary data pass through systems only intended to accept ASCII characters. Specifically, it uses 64 characters (hence the name Base 64) to represent data, by encoding each 6 bits of raw data as a single output character. Consequently, the output is approximately 133% of the size of the input. The default character set (as defined in RFC 4648) includes the upper and lower case letters of the English alphabet, the digits 0-9, and + and /. The spec also defines a “URL safe” encoding where the extra characters are - and _.

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