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Alpine Linux 3.12 Released With D Language Support, MIPS64 Port

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Linux

Version 3.12 of the Alpine Linux lightweight distribution built around musl libc and Busybox is now available for this platform popular with containers and other embedded use-cases.

While MIPS owner Wave Computing filed for bankruptcy earlier this month and other major setbacks in recent years for the MIPS architecture (including the abandoning of their Open MIPS plans), Alpine 3.12 is the first release now supporting 64-bit MIPS. MIPS64 big endian is supported by Alpine Linux 3.12 for the many MIPS64 systems still out there.

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Direct: Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released

Alpine Linux 3.12 Released with Initial MIPS64 Port

  • Alpine Linux 3.12 Released with Initial MIPS64 Port, Support for YubiKeys

    While not a major milestone, Alpine Linux 3.12 is here to introduce initial support for the MIPS64 (Big Endian) architecture. This means that you can now install the distribution on this platform.

    On top of that, this new stable release also introduces initial support for the D programming language, also known as Dlang.

Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released With “Big Endian”

  • Alpine Linux 3.12.0 Released With “Big Endian” and “Dlang” Support

    Alpine Linux has announced the release of major version 3.12.0, which is the first of the “3.12” stable series. Alpine is a Linux distribution that focuses on security, and it’s designed for routers, firewalls, VPNs, VoIP boxes, and servers. Moreover, it is particularly lightweight, small in size (130 Mb), simple to use, independent, and non-commercial. All in all, Alpine is a security-oriented OS designed for power users who want to use a solid basis upon which to build a robust system for whatever purpose they may have.

    The 3.12.0 release brings support for “mips64” (big-endian), and also the D programming language (Dlang). D is used in projects like Facebook, eBay, and Netflix, and generally, it is deployed in virtual machines, OS kernels, GPU programming, machine learning, web development, numerical analysis, and more. As for the big-endian architecture, this is the system of storing the most-significant byte of a word of digital data at the lower memory address of the storage location.

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