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Quarkus, a Kubernetes-native Java runtime, now fully supported by Red Hat

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Red Hat
  • Quarkus, a Kubernetes-native Java runtime, now fully supported by Red Hat

    Java was introduced 25 years ago, and to this day, remains one of the most popular programming languages among developers. However, Java has developed a reputation for not being a good fit for cloud-native applications. Developers look for (and often choose) alternative frameworks such as Go and Node.js to support their cloud-native development requirements.

    Why learn another language when you can use your existing skills? Quarkus allows Java developers to leverage their expertise to develop cloud-native, event-driven, reactive, and serverless applications. Quarkus provides a cohesive Java platform that feels familiar but new at the same time. Not only does it leverage existing Java standards, but it also provides a number of features that optimize developer joy, including live coding, unified configuration, IDE plugins, and more.

  • Red Hat Tosses Its Weight Behind Quarkus

    Following recent announcements, Red Hat is now ready in fully supporting Quarkus to enhance its Kubernetes support.

    Quarkus is a Kubernetes-native Java stack to make the language more appealing in cloud-native use-cases. Quarkus optimizes the Java experience for containers and serverless environments.

  • Red Hat Delivers Quarkus As A Fully Supported Framework In Red Hat Runtimes

    By adding Quarkus as a supported runtime, Red Hat is helping to bring Java into the modern, cloud-native application development landscape and to approaches like microservices, containers and serverless, and enabling Java developers to continue working in the language they know and love.

  • Red Hat Runtimes adds Kubernetes-native Quarkus Java stack

    Red Hat’s Quarkus, a Kubernetes-native Java stack, is now supported on the Red Hat Runtimes platform for developing cloud-native applications.

    A build of Quarkus is now part of Red Hat Runtimes middleware and integrates with the Red Hat OpenShift Kubernetes container platform for managing cloud deployments, Red Hat said this week.

The corresponding press release

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