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Ubuntu 20.10 Release Date & Planned Features (Continually Updated)

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Ubuntu

Now, admittedly, it’s only May; development of this release (which is codenamed ‘Groovy Gorilla’) is still in the early stages. But already know a few things about what to expect, when Ubuntu 20.10 will be released, how long it’ll be supported for, and even a few of the features devs are hoping to sneak in.

So keep reading to learn everything you need to know about Ubuntu 20.10 features, changes and improvements. And since this post is updated regularly throughout development why not bookmark it now to come check back and keep tabs on the progress!

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Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) Slated for Release on July 23rd

  • Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS (Focal Fossa) Slated for Release on July 23rd

    While many of you out there are still digging out all the cool new features of the recent Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) operating system or just barely took the wraps off it, the Ubuntu development team are working hard to bring you the next point release.

    Yes, I’m talking about Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS, the first point release of the Focal Fossa series, which will pack all the latest security fixes and software updates to provide the community with an up-to-date installation media.

Ubuntu 20.04 is right around the corner with many new features

  • Ubuntu 20.04 is right around the corner with many new features

    Ubuntu 20.04 – codenamed “Focal Fossa” – is set for its final stable release on April 23, with the new software version brining a number of new features to the OS, including WireGuard VPN.

    Ubuntu 20.04 is a long term support (LTS) version of the operating system, meaning that it will be supported for the next 5 years to come. As usual, the new version introduces some features to the benefit of its users – with some features being more exciting than others. One of the more exciting new features is the inclusion of WireGuard – a simple, fast and modern VPN that has the backing of Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux.

Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Coming on July with Fixes Packed

  • Ubuntu 20.04.1 LTS Coming on July with Fixes Packed

    The first point release of the Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is planned for release on July 2020. Ubuntu 20.04 LTS “Focal Fossa” released a while back and it was huge. The reason being are the performance improvements, stability, lots of features, latest drivers, and hardware support – all on the very positive side from the user perspective. At least, that’s what the post-release feedback from around the world says.

    [...]

    Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is supported until April 2025 bing a long term release and expected to get six point releases like this in its life span.

    If you are currently running Ubuntu 20.04 LTS focal fossa – you will be prompted to update/upgrade when Ubuntu 20.04.1 arrives in July. And if you are still deciding to update or upgrade, I would suggest you can wait till July 2020 to get the latest packages afresh.

First Ubuntu 20.04 Point Release Arrives July 23

  • First Ubuntu 20.04 Point Release Arrives July 23

    But the upcoming release is not totally lacking in interest.

    From July 23 users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will finally be notified that ‘a newer version of Ubuntu is available’ and, if they wish to upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, be able to do so.

    Ubuntu LTS releases only check for new LTS releases by default, and even then only “see” a new release once the first point release is made available.

    Why? Because LTS releases are about stability above all else. In a 5 year LTS cycle it’s not a huge issue to wait a couple of extra months. This way, users can be sure any early-bird bugs have been spotted, swooped on, and chowed down!

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Security Leftovers

Kernel: Reiser4 and Generic USB Display Driver

  • Reiser4 Updated For Linux 5.6 Kernel Support

    While the Linux 5.7 kernel is likely being released as stable today, the Reiser4 port to the Linux 5.6 kernel is out this weekend. Edward Shishkin continues working on Reiser4 while also spearheading work on the new Reiser4 file-system iteration of the Reiser file-system legacy. Taking a break from that Reiser5 feature work, Shishkin has updated the out-of-tree Reiser4 patches for Linux 5.6.0 compatibility. This weekend on SourceForge he uploaded the Reiser4 patch for upstream Linux 5.6.0 usage. This is just porting the existing 5.5.5-targeted code to the 5.6 code-base with no mention of any other bug fixes or improvements to Reiser4 in this latest patch.

  • The Generic USB Display Driver Taking Shape For Linux 5.9~5.10

    One of the interesting new happenings in the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver space is a Generic USB Display stack including a USB gadget driver that together allow for some interesting generic USB display setups. This work was motivated by being able to turn a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero into a USB to HDMI display adapter.

Games: Project Cars 2 and Valve/Vulkan

  • Project Cars 2 | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 19.10 | Steam Play

    Project Cars 2 running through Steam Play on Linux. Using my Logitech G29 which also worked as expected.

  • Valve continues to improve Linux Vulkan Shader Pre-Caching

    Recently we wrote about a new feature for Linux in the Steam Client Beta, where Steam can now sort out Vulkan shaders before running a game. With the latest build, it gets better. The idea of it, as a brief reminder, is to prepare all the shaders needed for Vulkan games while you download and / or before you hit Play. This would help to stop constant stuttering seen in some games on Linux, mostly from running Windows games in the Proton compatibility layer, as native / supported Linux games would usually do it themselves. Just another way Valve are trying to get Linux gaming on Steam in all forms into tip-top shape.

  • Steam Ironing Out Shader Pre-Caching For Helping Game Load Times, Stuttering

    Valve developers have been working on Vulkan shader pre-caching with their latest Steam client betas to help in allowing Vulkan/SPIR-V shaders to compile ahead of time, letting them be pre-cached on disk to allow for quicker game load times and any stuttering for games that otherwise would be compiling the shaders on-demand during gameplay, especially under Steam Play.

FreeBSD 11.4-RC2 Now Available

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA256

The second RC build of the 11.4-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

Installation images are available for:

o 11.4-RC2 amd64 GENERIC
o 11.4-RC2 i386 GENERIC
o 11.4-RC2 powerpc GENERIC
o 11.4-RC2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 11.4-RC2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 BANANAPI
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 BEAGLEBONE
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 CUBIEBOARD2
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 RPI-B
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 RPI2
o 11.4-RC2 armv6 WANDBOARD
o 11.4-RC2 aarch64 GENERIC

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/11.4/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/11.4" branch.

A summary of changes since 11.4-RC1 includes:

o The wpa_supplicant.conf(5) file has been fixed in bsdinstall(8).

o An update to the leap-seconds file.

o An update to mlx5_core to add new port module event types to decode.

o SCTP fixes.

o LLVM config headers have been fixed to correctly add zlib support.

o The ena(4) driver has been updated to version 2.2.0.

o loader(8) fixes for userboot.

o Fixes for compliance with RFC3168.

o A ps(1) update to permit the '-d' and '-p' flags to be used mutually.

o A knob to flush RSB on context switches if the machine has SMEP has
  been added.

o A fix to Vagrant images requiring the shells/bash port.

A list of changes since 11.3-RELEASE is available in the releng/11.4
release notes:

    https://www.freebsd.org/relnotes/11-RC2/relnotes/article.html

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 11.4-RELEASE cycle progresses.

=== Virtual Machine Disk Images ===

VM disk images are available for the amd64, i386, and aarch64
architectures.  Disk images may be downloaded from the following URL
(or any of the FreeBSD download mirrors):

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/VM-IMAGES/11.4-RC2/

The partition layout is:

    ~ 16 kB - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
    ~ 1 GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
    ~ 20 GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image
formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB and 165 MB
respectively (amd64/i386), decompressing to a 21 GB sparse image.

Note regarding arm64/aarch64 virtual machine images: a modified QEMU EFI
loader file is needed for qemu-system-aarch64 to be able to boot the
virtual machine images.  See this page for more information:

    https://wiki.freebsd.org/arm64/QEMU

To boot the VM image, run:

    % qemu-system-aarch64 -m 4096M -cpu cortex-a57 -M virt  \
	-bios QEMU_EFI.fd -serial telnet::4444,server -nographic \
	-drive if=none,file=VMDISK,id=hd0 \
	-device virtio-blk-device,drive=hd0 \
	-device virtio-net-device,netdev=net0 \
	-netdev user,id=net0

Be sure to replace "VMDISK" with the path to the virtual machine image.

=== Amazon EC2 AMI Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 EC2 AMIs are available in the following regions:

  eu-north-1 region: ami-0e03245dc3ecc5d35
  ap-south-1 region: ami-0100269e4d1a56492
  eu-west-3 region: ami-04d69369363a0d91f
  eu-west-2 region: ami-054fee32718b85ae0
  eu-west-1 region: ami-0b4ed21ce2fcffb67
  ap-northeast-2 region: ami-0ab69ea831245c032
  ap-northeast-1 region: ami-014ed1c7002845dae
  sa-east-1 region: ami-0779883a279143da5
  ca-central-1 region: ami-03526c4e41fbc5c0c
  ap-southeast-1 region: ami-0a1526319c431a535
  ap-southeast-2 region: ami-07b5f0fabb533a3ca
  eu-central-1 region: ami-0538d62ee3be9f769
  us-east-1 region: ami-059d76ab6e6e4063a
  us-east-2 region: ami-0c46e32a6eb527e29
  us-west-1 region: ami-0d46479f45e84d1f2
  us-west-2 region: ami-04d001870b4236742

=== Vagrant Images ===

FreeBSD/amd64 images are available on the Hashicorp Atlas site, and can
be installed by running:

    % vagrant init freebsd/FreeBSD-11.4-RC2
    % vagrant up

=== Upgrading ===

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386
systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

	# freebsd-update upgrade -r 11.4-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by
merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

	# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before
continuing.

	# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new
userland components:

	# freebsd-update install

It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible,
especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 11.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat11x and
other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

	# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove
stale files:

	# freebsd-update install
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