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Free Software, Proprietary Stuff and Openwashing

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  • BSD Now 351: Heaven: OpenBSD 6.7

    Backup and Restore on NetBSD, OpenBSD 6.7 available, Building a WireGuard Jail with FreeBSD's standard tools, who gets to chown things and quotas, influence TrueNAS CORE roadmap, and more.

  • The Open Source Catch-22 | Self-Hosted 19

    We react to recently proposed Home Assistant changes, Alex attempts an extreme remote install, and we take a look at HomelabOS.

    Plus why Chris continues to collect Raspberry Pi's at an alarming rate.

  • April the month of Linux releases and open source updates

    Linux releases and software updates, as every year, April almost never passes without a new event in Linux and open source world. This year, The month "overlooked us" with interesting events about Linux and open-source.

    So what is this events and news? This is what you will know in the following lines. Have a pleasant reading.

  • MauiKit and Maui apps 1.1.1

    Today, we are pleased to announce the release of MauiKit and Maui Apps 1.1.1!.

    Are you a developer and want to start developing cross-platform and convergent apps, targeting, among other things, the upcoming Linux mobile devices? Then join us on Telegram: https://t.me/mauiproject. If you are interested in testing this project and helping out with translations or documentation, you are also more than welcome.

    The Maui Project is free and open-source software incubated by the KDE Community and developed by Nitrux Latinoamericana.

  • Installation images renamed from .fs to .img

    In a commit touching quite a few files, Theo recently renamed the installation images from installXX.fs to installXX.img: [...]

  • Innovating and scaling efficiently with Kubernetes and MicroK8s

    With the benefits of Kubernetes now well established in the containerisation space, its adoption continues to exponentially increase. However, as developers and enterprises alike turn to Kubernetes for more and more types of use cases, available Kubernetes solutions often fail to meet their exact needs.

    Canonical’s extensive Kubernetes portfolio is centered around Charmed Kubernetes and MicroK8s, designed to provide full flexibility from cloud to edge in order to facilitate efficient innovation and scaling.

  • Open Source Artificial Intelligence: Leading Projects

    Open source artificial intelligence projects don't always get a lot of publicity, but they play a vital role in the development of artificial intelligence. Because these open source projects are often pursued as passion projects by developers (sometimes in colleges and universities), the advances are creative and particularly forward looking.

    Typically freed from the constraints of a corporate setting (though some are supported by companies), these open source AI projects can dream big - and often deliver ground breaking machine learning and AI advances.

    Also important: the advances from these leading open source AI projects fuel the larger AI sector. That is, a new idea from this month's AI project ends up next year (or even next month) in a high end AI solution sold by a company.

    Remember, if you know of additional top open source AI tools that should be on this list, please include them in the comments section below.

  • CrowdStrike Falcon Expands Linux Protection with Enhanced Prevention Capabilities
  • BlueMail Launches Support for Debian and Red Hat Linux in Major Expansion

    Blix Inc., a leading provider of messaging solutions to consumers and businesses, today announces its popular BlueMail client is now compatible with Debian and Red Hat Linux. With this expansion, BlueMail is now available on a dozen Linux distributions, including Arch Linux, CentOS, elementaryOS, Fedora, KDE Neon, Kubuntu, Manjaro, Linux Mint, openSUSE and Ubuntu. As the world faces an increasingly remote workforce, this expansion brings BlueMail's cross-platform productivity and safety features to a global network of consumers, companies, and IT business leaders.

  • Zooming Past Equity in Higher Education: Technocratic Pedagogy Fails Social Justice Test - Censored Notebook

    The response to COVID-19 by governing institutions has altered the lives and practices of people across the nation, including the students, faculty, and staff in higher education. One of the biggest changes in educational institutions has been the increased reliance on Zoom conferences in-place of traditional face-to-face classroom meetings. For example, in May 2020, the website for Ohlone College, a community college in Fremont, CA, had an announcement that read, “IMPORTANT: All classes will be held online during the 2020 Summer Term. Classes that have scheduled meeting days and times will meet via ConferZoom online.”

  • Zoom fatigue is real and it’s costly

    I think a good rule of thumb is to keep Zoom calls restricted to four people or fewer and 30 minutes or shorter. And even with four people, do email if you can, phone calls if you must and Zoom only if there's some really good reason for it.

  • GitHub Reinstates Popcorn Time Code Despite MPA 'Threat'

    Earlier this month, an MPA takedown notice pulled Popcorn Time's GitHub repository offline. The Hollywood group, which also represents Netflix, argued that the code facilitates mass copyright infringement. While that may be the case, Popcorn Time filed a counternotice arguing that they own the code. Faced with contradicting requests, Github has now reinstated the repository.

  • Chrome 83 adds DNS-over-HTTPS support and privacy tweaks

    After delays to Chrome version 81 in March, and the scrapping of version 82 a month later, this week sees the early arrival of Chrome 83 with a longer list of new security features than originally planned.

    As browser updates go, it’s a lot to take in although some of them are more tweaks to existing features than anything radically new.

    It’s hard to pick out a single big feature, although for some it will be upgraded support for DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH), a privacy technology that makes it much harder for third parties (ISPs, the Government, malevolent parties) to see which web domains someone is visiting.

    See our previous coverage for more explanation of the benefits of DoH (and forthcoming support for it in Windows 10) but be aware that Google still doesn’t make using this as easy as it should be.

  • Google rolls out pro-privacy DNS-over-HTTPS support in Chrome 83... with a handy kill switch for corporate IT

    Google released Chrome 83 on Tuesday after skipping version 82 entirely due to coronavirus-related challenges, bringing with it security for DNS queries, a revised extension interface that developers dislike, and a few other features.

    The latest iteration of Google's browser implements DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH), a way to prevent domain-name queries from being observed on the network, between the browser and the DNS server, at least. Traditionally, DNS queries and replies sent using TCP or UDP are not encrypted, even when internet users are interacting with websites over an encrypted HTTPS connection.

    DoH was proposed to improve privacy and security by wrapping TLS encryption around the DNS queries that convert human-friendly domain names, like theregister.co.uk, into network addresses computers can connect to, such as 104.18.5.22.

    Google has been testing DoH since Chrome 78 last year, and is now rolling it out proper. Mozilla has been doing the same in its Firefox browser, and in February made DoH available to US Firefox users by default.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Firefox Reality for HoloLens 2

    Mozilla's Mixed Reality team is excited to announce the first public release of Firefox Reality in the Microsoft store. We announced at Mobile World Congress 2019 that we were working with Microsoft to bring a mixed reality browser to the HoloLens 2 platform, and we're proud to share the result of that collaboration.

    Firefox Reality is an experimental browser for a promising new platform, and this initial release focuses on exposing the powerful AR capabilities of HoloLens 2 devices to web developers through the new WebXR standard.

More in Tux Machines

Switching from MacBook to Chromebook: Is Chrome OS good enough?

Chrome OS often gets maligned as a platform that you can't do "real work" on, and in some cases, that's true. But sometimes, you don't need a computer that does absolutely everything, and that's why I decided to give switching to Chrome OS on my laptop a try. While I've retained my iMac as a proper workstation, my aging MacBook Air was due for an upgrade, and the opportunity to switch platforms presented itself. Could a simpler, cheaper Chromebook replace my MacBook for working on the go? While I found that the answer was decidedly "no" in some situations—and that simply adapting to Chrome OS and its limitations was a huge adjustment—I do think Chrome now has a place in my workflow, albeit one that is rather hit or miss. Chrome is also definitely still a problematic platform, and those limitations tend to define it in a lot of ways, which I'll explore more in this post. For some added context, here are the devices I'm throwing into the mix: I use a 27-inch iMac with 40GB of RAM and a 9th-gen 3.7GHz 6-core Intel Core i5 at home while my MacBook is running on 4GB of RAM and an aging 4th-gen dual-core Core i5. My new laptop/convertible is a 14-inch HP Chromebook x360 with 8GB of RAM and an 8th-gen dual-core Intel Core i3 (Taylor reviewed a similarly equipped variant here at Android Police). Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: #3 T^4: Customizing The Shell

    The third video (following the announcement, the shell colors) one as well as last week’s shell prompt one, is up in the stil new T^4 series of video lightning talks with tips, tricks, tools, and toys. Today we cover customizing the shell some more.

  • Why slowing new feature development can be the best way to maintain an open source project

    John Byrd is credited with a great statement: "Good programmers write good code. Great programmers write no code. Zen programmers delete code." It's perhaps an overstatement, but the idea behind it is spot on: As a code base accumulates cruft over time, great engineers will invest the time necessary to strip the code of technical debt. As DJ Walker-Morgan once put it, "Deleted lines [of code] are the final burn down of the ground where tech debt built." [...] We've seen this same principle applied in other projects. Apache Cassandra is a good, recent example. In talking with Cassandra insiders, there was a point when stability took precedence in the Cassandra community, with Apple, Netflix, and other big users of Cassandra joining forces on this goal as users got stuck on version 3.11. As cool as it sounds to issue yet another release, Cassandra users were tiring of revalidating their databases every two months when a new release hit. The Cassandra 4.0 effort has been a broad-based, community effort to get the Cassandra house in order.

  • The End is Near for Zend Server Basic PHP

    Zend Server Basic, the free PHP runtime used by thousands of IBM i shops, will cease being offered starting in July 2021. That’s the word from Perforce, the company that now owns Zend and its lineup of PHP tools and technologies. The replacement, of course, is the new community edition of PHP that became available via RPM in late 2019. Starting in 2006, Zend Technology began to develop a special version of its PHP runtime for IBM i, which was then called i5/OS. This offering, dubbed Zend Core for i5/OS, provided a familiar way for users of the iSeries server (as it was known back then) to partake of the digital bounty that was (and is) the PHP language and the estimated 10,000 software applications that ran on it at the time. While nobody knows for sure how many IBM i (System i, iSeries, AS/400, etc.) shops adopted Zend Core for i5/OS and its follow-ons and continued to use it to power their PHP applications on the box over the years, the number is almost certainly currently measured in the thousands. Back in 2006, IT Jungle reported that, according to Zend, there had been thousands of downloads of the beta of Zend Core for i5/OS just four months after it was released in March 2006.

  • PestPHP Released as Open-Source

    Console legend Nuno Maduro has open-sourced Pest, an elegant PHP testing framework that focuses on simplicity.

  • Seungha Yang: Unfortunately GStreamer 1.17

    Unfortunately GStreamer 1.17 is a development version and any binary/installer is not officially released. But you can build it using Cerbero which is a project for packaging GStreamer framework, or simpler way is that you might be able to try gst-build, that’s a meta-project to build GStreamer mostly used for development purpose.

  • How the End of Life for Open Source Python 2 Affects Enterprises
  • Test and Code: 114: The Python Software Foundation (PSF) Board Elections - Ewa Jodlowska / Christopher Neugebauer

    "The mission of the Python Software Foundation is to promote, protect, and advance the Python programming language, and to support and facilitate the growth of a diverse and international community of Python programmers." That's a lot of responsibility, and to that end, the PSF Board Directors help out quite a bit. If you want to be a part of the board, you can. There's an election coming up right around the corner and you gotta get your nomination in by May 31. You can also join the PSF if you want to vote for who gets to be part of the board.

  • Consistent Hashing

    Consistent hashing is a hashing technique that performs really well when operated in a dynamic environment where the distributed system scales up and scales down frequently. The core concept of Consistent Hashing was introduced in the paper Consistent Hashing and RandomTrees: Distributed Caching Protocols for Relieving Hot Spots on the World Wide Web but it gained popularity after the famous paper introducing DynamoDB - Dynamo: Amazon’s Highly Available Key-value Store. Since then the consistent hashing gained traction and found a ton of use cases in designing and scaling distributed systems efficiently. The two famous examples that exhaustively use this technique are Bit Torrent, for their peer-to-peer networks and Akamai, for their web caches. In this article we dive deep into the need of Consistent Hashing, the internals of it, and more importantly along the way implement it using arrays and Binary Search.

  • Hazelcast CTO: 25 years of Java, welcome to the data-driven 3rd act

    It’s easy to forget how important Java – celebrating its 25th birthday – has been. Before Java, computing was a place of siloed and proprietary clients and servers. Java was more than just a programming language – it was essentially a platform for building a wide range of applications. Java delivered a consistent and efficient programming experience for developers combined with write-once-run-anywhere portability. Today, we see that in containerisation and cloud. Java is poised to begin its third act – supporting cloud-native, data-intensive applications in analytics and Artificial Intelligence and IoT on 5G. That’s because Java’s foundations have continued to develop along with those first principles of developer productivity – simpler to build, more efficient code – with platform scale and performance. Not, that Java’s data destiny was manifest – Java’s had wobbles.

CMS-Centric FOSS Funding

  • London-based New Vector nabs €4.1 million for ‘Matrix’, its decentralised comms ecosystem

    Today New Vector, who is behind new collaboration solutions used by European governments and organisations alike, has announced raising approximately €4.1 million from Automattic Inc. This new investor brings both the financial backing and experience of being the parent company of web publishing and e-commerce platforms WordPress.com, WooCommerce, Jetpack, and enterprise WordPress VIP. New Vector, founded in 2017, is on a mission to enable governments, businesses and individuals to run their own secure communication infrastructure, while interconnecting via the global Matrix network. So far the startup has developed Riot, the flagship Matrix-based messaging app, and Modular, the leading Matrix-based hosting platform. New Vector, formed by the team who created Matrix, also provides significant development to the Matrix open source project (an open network for secure, decentralised communication which lets organisations and individuals run their own collaboration apps).

  • Automattic pumps $4.6M into New Vector to help grow Matrix, an open, decentralized comms ecosystem
  • Headless CMS company Strapi raises another $10 million
  • Open-Source 'Headless' CMS Company Strapi Raises $10 Million

    Strapi — the open-source “headless” content management system (CMS) — announced it raised $10 million in Series A funding led by Index Ventures. Including this round of funding, the company has raised a total of $14 million. Previously, Strapi raised $4 million in seed funding in October 2019 with Accel and Stride.VC. And the company also hired former Docker head of community Victor Coisne as VP of marketing and the company also announced plans to open its first U.S. office in San Francisco.

TeleIRC 2.0.0 Released

  • TeleIRC v2.0.0 is officially here!

    After almost eight months of work, the TeleIRC Team is happy to announce General Availability of TeleIRC v2.0.0 today. Thanks to the hard work of our volunteer community, we are celebrating an on-time release of a major undertaking to make a more sustainable future for TeleIRC.

  • What’s new in TeleIRC v2.0.0

    TeleIRC v2.0.0 is the latest major release of our open source Telegram <=> IRC bridge. Download the latest release and read the release announcement for the full story. There are several new and noteworthy changes in TeleIRC v2.0.0. This post walks you through the major changes and differences for TeleIRC v2.0.0. Read on for the highlight reel of this release.