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In Free Software, the Community is the Most Important Ingredient: Jerry Bezencon of Linux Lite [Interview]

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GNU
Linux
Interviews

Linux Lite was started in 2012 for 3 important reasons. One, I wanted to dispel myths that a Linux based operating system was hard to use. Two, at that time, there was a shortage of simple, intuitive desktop experiences on Linux that offered long-term support. Three, I had used Linux for over 10 years before starting Linux Lite.

I felt I needed to give back to a community that had given so much to me. A community that taught me that by sharing code and knowledge, one could have a dramatically positive impact over peoples computing experiences.

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Videos: Software Freedom, OpenSUSE 15.2, "Rolling Rhino" and Linux Headlines