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What Makes a System76 Computer?

In homage to the revolutionary age of 1776, System76 revolutionizes open source technology and declares independence from our proprietary rulers. But what are the key ingredients that go into making a computer so revolutionary? The following delicious details outline the qualities we value in all of our computers. Note: Licking your screen is not an effective way to taste the deliciousness of this blog post. System76 users depend on heavy computational power to get their work done, and in some cases require a literal heavy computer. Our hardware is designed to support top-line processors and graphics cards, allowing you to consistently plow through your workload. We’re not going to call on a sedan to do a bulldozer’s job. Read more

ZFS focus on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS: ZSys general principle on state management

After our previous general presentation of ZSys, it’s “”“time”“” to deep dive to one of its main predominant feature: state management! A little technical detour first. as this question will necessarily arise, especially from those familiar with ZFS concepts. We have purposively chosen the “state” terminology to prevent system administrators and in general, all those familiar with ZFS to confuse if with snapshot datasets. Basically a state is a set of datasets, all frozen in time (apart from the current state), which regrouped together forms a system “state” that you can chose to reboot on. Those group of datasets can be either made of snapshot datasets (read only) (which is what most of advanced ZFS users will expect), but it can also be filesystem datasets (read write), made of filesystem datasets clone of the current state datasets. You can boot to any of those. Read more

Apache Subversion 1.14.0

KDE Applications, Wireshark, IceWM update in Tumbleweed

The last week has produced a total of three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots bringing the total amount of snapshots for the month to 18. All 18 snapshots have recorded a stable rating above 91, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer. With 14 of them, recording a rating of 99 and the last two snapshots trending at a 99 rating. The most recent 202000526 snapshot provided the 3.2.4 release of Wireshark. The new version fixed a Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures where it was possible to make Wireshark crash by injecting a malformed packet onto the wire or by convincing someone to read a malformed packet trace file. Linux Kernel 5.6.14 re-established support for RTL8401 chip version. DNS server and client utilities package bind 9.16.3 fixed to security problems and added engine support for OpenSSL Edwards-curve Digital Signature Algorithm implementation. Document viewer evince 3.36.1 updated translations, fixed an incorrect markup in the Czech User Interface and updated the French help image. SSL VPN client package openconnect 8.10 installed a bash completion script and fixed a potential buffer overflow with security communications library GnuTLS. GNOME’s 0.30.10 image organizer shotwell, which was the subject of a recently settled a patient lawsuit, modified web publishing authentication to comply with Google’s requirements. Read more