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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • How to configure a print server with Ubuntu Server, CUPS, and Bonjour

    You probably have a few Linux machines in your data center that have a few CPU cycles to spare. Why not make use of them for a printer server? After all, most businesses still rely on printing for certain departments. When your business is large enough to require a print server, you might as well go with a tried and true system: Linux.

  • A “Hello World” virtual machine running the Hurd

    There’s been a bit of speculation as to whether our April 1st post was a joke. Part of it was a joke: we’re not deprecating Linux-libre, fear not! But when we published it, it was already April 2nd in Eastern parts of the world and thus, not surprisingly, the remainder of the post was less of a joke.

  • Reviewing Docker Logs

    Many of you know that it's possible to access Docker container logs using "docker logs" command. But fewer people know that it's possible to follow logs stream for new messages (like tail -f), and even fewer yet are aware that it's possible to specify timestamps of the period you want to review – showing only specific logs during that period.

  • 7 echo command uses in Linux with examples

    Echo command outputs strings that are passed as arguments and usually used in shell scripts and batch files to output status text to a screen or as a source part of a pipeline. Syntax: echo [-n] [string ...] Let's learn its usage in Linux with practical examples in today's session of Terminal Tuts.

  • 4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN

    4 Methods to Setup and Use a VPN Let's go over the setup and usage of VPNs as they are the best method to work from home. I have set up several VPNs over the past couple of weeks and here are a few of the methods I have used.

  • Linux system housekeeping 101: Managing file storage

    One of your many duties as a system administrator is the often daunting task of keeping your system's filesystems clear of clutter. It's not an easy task, is it? This first article in a short housekeeping series explores some basic system housekeeping concepts that will keep your systems healthy and your users responsible.

  • How to Take Screenshots without Shadows in KDE

    KDE’s desktop effects are fantastic, except when taking screenshots for use on your site or blog. Great-looking shadows around every desktop element are captured as well and can end up conflicting with your site or blog’s theme. Most screenshot tools insist on capturing them, and the option they offer to disable decorations can also change how windows look. The only solution seems to be to capture a rectangular area and then manually define the region of each screenshot or maybe to edit each screenshot afterward in something like GIMP.

  • How to Install Shutter Screenshot Tool in Ubuntu 20.04

    This quick tutorial shows how to install Shutter, one of the most popular screenshot applications for Linux desktop, in Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

    Shutter is removed from the main Ubuntu repositories since Ubuntu 18.10, along with some old Gnome libraries required by the screenshot tool. It is however can be easily installed via the community maintained PPA repository in Ubuntu 19.10, Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How To: Recover Deleted Files With PhotoRec

    If you find yourself here reading this article, it probably means something has gone terribly wrong. Take a deep breath, we’re going to get through this. Buried in the depths of the Google search results for “deleted file recovery,” past the very aggressive SEO results of various companies trying to get you to buy their software, lies a result for one of my favorite pieces of free open-source software, PhotoRec. It is a companion program to TestDisk, another piece of wonderful open-source software, created by CGSecurity under the GNU General Public License. In this guide, we will go through the relatively painless process of recovering deleted files with PhotoRec. These tools are especially useful for recovering files from portable flash media used with digital cameras.

  • emacs and uemacs

More in Tux Machines

Ardour 6.0 Information

Our friends at Ardour have released Version 6.0, and we would like to offer them a huge congratulations! While the source code and their own builds were available on release day, many of you have been waiting for Ardour 6.0 to come to Ubuntu’s repositories. Today, that day came. Ardour 6.0 has landed in Ubuntu Groovy Gorilla (future 20.10) and will be on Ubuntu Studio’s daily spins of Groovy Gorilla within 24 hours of this writing. Unfortunately, it is not possible to backport Ardour 6.0 into Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, nor would we want to. This is because if we do, we might disrupt the workflow of people who are currently working with projects in 5.12 that are relying on its functionality and sound. Ardour 6.0 has an all-new Digital Sound Processor (DSP), and as such it may sound somewhat different. Read more

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Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Dear Diary – Week 32

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers. Before kicking off this week’s blog, there’s a few recent interesting developments that caught my eye. The first one is merely a cosmetic change. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has decided to rename Raspbian to Raspberry Pi OS. Forgive me if I accidentally forget the name change. The real news is that a new model of the RPI4 has been launched. The major improvement offered by the new model. 8GB of RAM, wow! That’s an impressive chunk of memory on a tiny computer. This development doesn’t render the 32-bit operating system obsolete. After all, the 32-bit system allows multiple processes to share all 8GB of memory, subject to the restriction that no single process can use more than 3GB. But advanced users who need to map all 8GB into the address space of a single process need a 64-bit userland. Step forward the second exciting development — a new 64-bit Raspberry Pi OS. Unsurprisingly, it’s currently in beta. Read more

Code your hardware using this open source RTOS

In general computing, an operating system is software that provides a computer's basic functions. It ensures that a computer detects and responds to peripherals (like keyboards, screens, mobile devices, printers, and so on), and it manages memory and drive space. Even though modern operating systems make it seem that multiple programs are running at the same time, a CPU core can run only a single thread at a time. Each task is executed so quickly and in such rapid succession that the result appears to be massive multi-tasking. This is managed by a subroutine called a scheduler. Read more