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Virtualization: Linux's killer app

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Software

I came away from InfoWorld's Virtualization Executive Forum this week with two conclusions. First, server virtualization is definitely a big deal. This time last year, customers and ISVs still seemed to be struggling to come to terms with this new approach to deploying and managing servers; today it's full speed ahead. And, second, nowhere is virtualization hotter than in the Linux market.

When I sat down for an interview with Red Hat CTO Brian Stevens at the show, I asked him if there were any important new technologies in the forthcoming Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 that we should touch upon. He mentioned a few initiatives and community-based efforts that are under way at Red Hat, including work on an open source, standards-based message queuing product.

But as far as RHEL 5 is concerned, he said, virtualization is the big news. Similarly, Novell made a big deal about its support for Xen virtualization with the release of Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10 last year.

It's easy to see why this technology is so exciting for Linux administrators.

Full Story.

re: Virtualization

And the winner for restating the most obvious thing in IT goes to.... this article.

Or the shorter version: "well duh!".

Is there anyone in IT that hasn't already long ago reached the conclusion that Virtual Systems is the next big thing?

I'm waiting for this guys follow up article "Applications as a Web Service - watch and wait for it!" or "Web 2.0, she's a coming".

Way to stay somewhere within the near vicinity of what's happening on the leading edge of technology there Neil.

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