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Sharing to Tackle Pandemic

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OSS
  • Open source approach for patients arriving at the clinic with Clinic Arrivals

    All of this is done with existing technology that does not require the patient to download an app and that is easily integrated with the PMS through APIs.

    Video conferencing is being done through the open source OpenVidu, which means patients simply have to click on a link in the SMS and there are no apps to download.

    The SMS gateway is provided by Twilio, which lets users send and receive text messages using web service APIs.

  • Developers take on COVID-19 with open-source projects, hackathons

    In the past few weeks the coronavirus pandemic has taken hold in the United States, and the disease will continue to have a massive impact around the world for the foreseeable future. But even in the midst of panic and uncertainty, communities are coming together to do what they can. People are 3D printing face shields and sewing masks for healthcare workers, offering to buy groceries and household supplies for the elderly or immunocompromised, and even donating their computer’s GPU power to the cause.

    And developers aren’t absent from this list of people trying to do whatever they can to help. A quick glance into the trending section of GitHub shows that a good portion are COVID-19-related, and there are a number more than that living on GitHub. While medical professionals are on the front lines of the COVID-19 fight, developers are fighting the disease from their computers.

  • MIT Team Develops $100 Ventilator

    The team has open sourced the design of the simple ventilator device that could be built with about just $100 worth of parts.

  • MIT open sources cheap ventilator design in response to worldwide shortage

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has developed a cheap ventilator and is releasing the design to the open source community in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

    The COVID-19 outbreak, of which there are roughly 724,000 confirmed cases at the time of writing, has exposed a worldwide shortage of ventilators -- critical equipment for those that are severely ill.

    While manufacturers are overhauling their assembly lines to produce ventilators, masks, and key protective gear for medical professionals on the front line, demand has far outstripped supply -- and ventilators can be very expensive with price tags of up to $30,000 each in the United States.

Medtronic Open-source its Ventilator. Open-source for humanity

  • Medtronic Open-source its Ventilator. Open-source for humanity

    Medtronic Chairman and CEO "Omar Ishrak" has announced releasing Medtronic "PB 560 Ventilator" as an open-source leading to a storm of hope among doctors and engineers in many countries.

    [...]

    As an open-source enthusiast, I am very happy about releasing such a device as an open-source, but as a doctor, I am truly grateful for this intuitive.

    I believe this COVID19 outbreak crisis has created and still creating generous gifts as it takes, people are coming together to help, and doctors and nurses who were under-evaluated and under-appreciated in several countries, are leading the people thru this crisis.

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