Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Games: Burning Knight, 'art of rally', and Compiler Improvements for Games

Filed under
Gaming
  • Burning Knight will have you steal everything and make a run for it in the new demo

    Out now is the demo for Burning Knight, an action-packed roguelike with a bit of a twist on the usual dungeon crawling. What's so different? Well, you're a bit of a thief. The idea is to run through as much of the Burning Knight's castle as you can and pinch all the treasures. You can also rescue a few people if you wish.

    What makes it slightly amusing, is the Burning Knight follows you around and they get very angry when you find keys to get into their treasure rooms. Telling you not to touch things and then trying to shoot you when you inevitably go "ooooo shiny!" and then run away with something.

  • Stylish top-down rally game 'art of rally' has a demo up now for you to grind some dirt

    Drive away your worries this week with the demo of 'art of rally', an upcoming top-down stylish rally game from the creator of Absolute Drift.

    While there's no current set date for the final release, the demo at least does work very nicely and it's a lot of fun already. You get to try out two iconic rally cars with one from Group 2 and one from Group B, across a mixed gravel-tarmac stage from Finland full of jumps and all sorts. There's multiple weather conditions implemented too like fog and rain with different times of day as well.

  • Intel ports AMD compiler code for a 10% performance boost in Linux gaming

    Linux gaming may not be as popular as gaming in Windows, but it is a growing segment. It is also improving, both in terms of support and performance. As it pertains to the latter, Jason Ekstrand, a member of Intel's open source 3D driver team, is seeing some promising results in a handful of games running in Linux after porting AMD compiler code to Intel graphics hardware.

    The code is derived from ACO, short for AMD COmpiler, which is essentially a shader compiler spearheaded by Valve. First announced last July, Valve at the time said it was intended to deliver the "best possible code generation for game shaders, and fastest possible compilation speed." It was also intended to replace AMD's own LLVM compiler.

    As spotted by Phoronix, Ekstrand has enabled an I/O vectorization pass in an Intel driver for Linux, based on open source code originally written for ACO for use in AMD's Radeon Vulkan drivers.

  • Intel NIR I/O Vectorization Ported From The AMD ACO Back-End - ~10% Performance Boost

    Lead Intel "ANV" open-source Vulkan driver developer Jason Ekstrand has ported an optimization from the Valve-backed AMD "ACO" compiler over to the NIR code-base for delivering some sizable performance improvements.

    Ekstrand has enabled an I/O vectorization pass for NIR that is originally based on the ACO code for the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver. This vectorization pass is enabled for UBOs, SSBOs, global memory, and SLM.

Intel used AMD code to get a 10% frame-rate boost in some Linux

  • Intel used AMD code to get a 10% frame-rate boost in some Linux games

    This should be another promising step forward for gaming on Linux, then, at least for those who are using an Intel GPU (in other words, integrated graphics – although Intel does have discrete Xe graphics cards in the pipeline for the future at some point, which we’ve been hearing a lot about in recent times).

    Of course, Valve has been pushing hard elsewhere in the Linux gaming arena, most notably with the release of Proton (back in 2018) for allowing Steam (Windows) games to be played on Linux systems with a minimum of overhead and performance loss.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

9 Best Free Linux Webcam Tools (Updated 2020)

A webcam is a video capture device that is either connected to a computer directly (typically by USB) or over a computer network. Many modern netbooks and laptops have a built-in webcam. Webcams spice up online communication by offering real-time video chat and webcasting. These tiny cameras enable users to chat in realtime with friends and family, send video email around the world, to videoconference with co-workers and clients, and even to broadcast a TV-like channel over the net. Other people use a webcam as part of a security system, making use of motion detection to receive image and video intrusion alerts, both interior and exterior, of a building or home. Read more

9 open source JavaScript frameworks for front-end web development

About a decade ago, the JavaScript developer community began to witness fierce battles emerging among JavaScript frameworks. In this article, I will introduce some of the most well-known of these frameworks. And it's important to note that these are all open source JavaScript projects, meaning that you can freely utilize them under an open source license and even contribute to the source code and communities. If you prefer to follow along as I explore these frameworks, you can watch my video. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 Gets 8GB RAM, Raspbian 64-bit (Beta)

The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B was launched in June 2019 with Broadcom BCM2711 Arm Cortex-A72 processor coupled with either 1, 2, or 4GB LPDDR4 RAM. But there were expectations that a Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM or an 8GB eMMC flash may be eventually launched, as some of the user guides read “Product name: Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 1 GB, 2 GB, 4 GB + 8 GB variants”. We now know the answer as the Raspberry Pi Foundation has just introduced Raspberry Pi 4 with 8GB RAM. Read more

Reduce Reloading Download Size on Ubuntu

Reload is the process refreshing the information of download sources in an Ubuntu system. If you observe, you will find that actually Ubuntu downloads several dozen megabytes of data when reloading and in fact you can reduce up to half size. This article supplies you information to tinker with that with sources.list configuration and APT command. You will see best of this in an experiment-dedicated system if you have. Lastly, I practiced this on Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa and you can practice this also on other versions. Enjoy tinkering! Read more