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Changelog: Nitrux 1.2.7

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GNU
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Linux

Today is the day! — Nitrux 1.2.7 is available to download

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.2.7. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support.

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Nitrux 1.2.7 build 270320 Run Through

Nitrux 1.2.7 overview

How to install Nitrux 1.2.7

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