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Internet: Remote Work, Daniel Stenberg on Curl and QUIC/HTTP/3

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  • Our Essential List of Free Software for Remote Work

    Team chat has already become an essential tool for teams looking to be more collaborative and less reliant on email. At Purism we use Matrix for team chat, 1 to 1 calls, video conferencing via Jitsi (open source video conferencing), adhoc file sharing and all our community chat channels. Matrix is a distributed (federated) network, similar to email, which means you can communicate across Matrix servers and compatible services.

    You can self host Matrix or use a public instance like our own free Librem Chat service part of Librem One. All the goodness of Matrix conveniently hosted for you and accessible with one account that also gives you access to Librem Social, our hosted Mastodon instance, and our premium services: end-to-end encrypted email and VPN.

    [...]

    Most office-based teams already have email and things like a company newsletter but we thought we’d share how we manage ours. Our company email and Librem Mail are powered by Dovecot and we use GNU Mailman for our newsletter and mailing lists.

  • Daniel Stenberg: A curl dashboard

    When I wrote up my looong blog post for the curl’s 22nd anniversary, I vacuumed my home directories for all the leftover scripts and partial hacks I’d used in the past to produce graphs over all sorts of things in the curl project. Being slightly obsessed with graphs, that means I got a whole bunch of them.

    I made graphs with libreoffice

    I dusted them off and made sure they all created a decent CSV output that I could use. I imported that data into libreoffice’s calc spreadsheet program and created the graphs that way. That was fun and I was happy with the results – and I could also manually annotate them with additional info. I then created a new git repository for the purpose of hosting the statistics scripts and related tools and pushed my scripts to it. Well, at least all the ones that seemed to work and were the most fun.

    Having done the hard work once, it felt a little sad to just have that single moment snapshot of the project at the exact time I created the graphs, just before curl’s twenty-second birthday. Surely it would be cooler to have them updated automatically?

  • A QUIC look at HTTP/3

    Each HTTP session requires a TCP connection which, in turn, requires a three-way handshake to set up. Once that is done, "we can send data in a reliable data stream", Stenberg explained. TCP transmits data in the clear, so everyone can read what is transferred; the same thus holds true for the non-encrypted HTTP protocol. However, 80% of requests today are using the encrypted version, called Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS), according to statistics of Mozilla (Firefox users) and Google (Chrome users). "The web is getting more and more encrypted", Stenberg explained. HTTPS uses Transport Layer Security (TLS); it adds security on the top of the stack of protocols, which are (in order): IP, TCP, TLS, and HTTP. The cost of TLS is another handshake that increases the latency. In return, we get privacy, security, and "you know you're talking to the right server".

    HTTP/1 required clients to establish one new TCP connection per object, meaning that for each request, the browser needed to create a connection, send the request, read the response, then close it. "TCP is very inefficient in the beginning", Stenberg explained; connections transmit data slowly just after being established, then increase the speed until they discover what the link can support. With only one object to fetch before closing the connection, TCP was never getting up to speed. In addition, a typical web page includes many elements, including JavaScript files, images, stylesheets, and so on. Fetching one object at a time is slow, so browser developers responded by creating multiple connections in parallel.

    That created too many connections to be handled by the servers, so typically the number of connections for each client was limited. The browser had to choose which of its few allowed connections to use for the next object; that led to the so-called "head-of-line blocking" problem. Think of a supermarket checkout line; you might choose the one that looks shortest, only to be stuck behind a customer with some sort of complicated problem. A big TCP efficiency improvement was added for HTTP/1.1 in 1997: open TCP connections can be reused for other requests. That improved the slow-start problem, but not the head-of-line blocking issue, which can be made even worse.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Update on the Plumbers Covid-19 Situation

    We’re still planning to hold Plumbers, but adopting a wait and see attitude to the in-person component. As people have noticed, the global prospect for being able to travel to Halifax in August seems to be getting worse, so we’re posting this to give more transparency to what the Plumbers Conference decision points and options are. Our first consideration is a go/no-go decision point for the in-person conference. Currently, the date we were planning to put the first batch of tickets on-sale (15 May) represents the ideal date for this because it gives time (another 6 weeks) for more clarity to emerge on the situation, while avoiding people doing early purchases only to be disappointed if the event has to be cancelled at a later date.

  • AMD's Marek Olšák Lands Even More OpenGL Threading Improvements Into Mesa 20.1

    One month ago to the day I was writing about OpenGL threading improvements for Mesa 20.1 and since then more "GLTHREAD" work has materialized and successfully landed for improving the Mesa OpenGL driver performance. Longtime AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák has been leading this recent work on GLTHREAD. Over the past month he has landed various GLTHREAD optimizations and whitelisting more games to flip on "mesa_glthread" by default.

  • Microsoft announces IPE, a new code integrity feature for Linux [Ed: Proprietary software of Microsoft would only make GNU/Linux weaker, not stronger]

Audiocasts/Shows: Pagure, Python and Linux Headlines

  • Pagure a GitLab Alternative: Neal Gompa | Jupiter Extras 69

    Pagure, the free software GitLab alternative no one is talking about. Neal Gompa joins us to discuss what makes it unique, which projects are using it, and the significant adoption in progress.

  • Building The Seq Language For Bioinformatics

    Bioinformatics is a complex and computationally demanding domain. The intuitive syntax of Python and extensive set of libraries make it a great language for bioinformatics projects, but it is hampered by the need for computational efficiency. Ariya Shajii created the Seq language to bridge the divide between the performance of languages like C and C++ and the ecosystem of Python with built-in support for commonly used genomics algorithms. In this episode he describes his motivation for creating a new language, how it is implemented, and how it is being used in the life sciences. If you are interested in experimenting with sequencing data then give this a listen and then give Seq a try!

  • 2020-04-06 | Linux Headlines

    Red Hat names Paul Cormier as President and CEO, Unleashed OS has come to an end, the latest release of the Kaidan XMPP chat client adds audio and video messaging, and the open source eBook reader Foliate has a redesigned user interface for a distraction-free reading experience.

OSS Leftovers

  • qView is a minimalistic image viewer for Windows, Linux and macOS

    The program doesn't use a lot of resources when you use it normally. I did notice a memory spike viewing a slideshow of high resolution photos, it jumped from 75MB to 150MB, but that may have been due to the fact that the picture was very large in size. Otherwise, it stayed in the 70s for the most part.

  • 6 Open-Source AI Frameworks You Should Know About

    Google’s open-source framework TensorFlow is an ecosystem of tools, libraries and resources that’s used by many popular companies like Airbnb, eBay, DropBox and more. TensorFlow aims to simplify and abstract away the complexity of machine learning algorithms to streamline development. Using visual models and flowgraphs, developers and data scientists can quickly create neural networks and other machine learning models to leverage data. Airbnb, for example, is using TensorFlow to categorize apartment listing photos to ensure they accurately represent a particular space.

  • The OpenUK Awards are now open for nominations.

    We are looking for the best in open source, hardware and data in the UK. Who had achieved something great? Who has not been recognised? Which company or project are doing fabulous work that needs exposure?

Openwashing and SUSE