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SUSE offers free enterprise Linux support to medical devices manufacturers

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Red Hat

SUSE, a major Linux and open-source cloud company, will help any organizations building medical devices to fight COVID-19.

The Germany-based company is doing this by offering free support and maintenance for its flagship SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) operating system and container technologies. These can be embedded in medical devices. These SUSE programs and their support packages are available immediately to meet the urgent demand to get medical devices into the hands of users as fast as possible.

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SUSE Offers Its Technologies For Free To Combat COVID-19

  • SUSE Offers Its Technologies For Free To Combat COVID-19

    “The current global pandemic requires more from us than simply trying to survive as companies and individuals,” said SUSE CEO Melissa Di Donato. “We have cutting-edge open source technology and know-how that can help others in the fight to save lives, and we will share it immediately and without charge.”

The original from the CEO

  • SUSE’s Commitment to Combat COVID-19

    Open source is rooted in community – through unwavering collaboration, compassion, and innovation our global communities are stepping up to support those who are and may be affected by COVID-19. High performance computing, crowdsourcing, hackathons, and innovative tracking are all helping us win this unprecedented fight. From myself and everyone at SUSE, thank you for being the difference.

    SUSE is proud to be part of the open source community, and we are committed to doing our part to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. I am thrilled to share that SUSE is offering operating systems and container technologies for organizations that are producing medical devices to fight COVID-19. I encourage you all to read the press release below for more information about this new initiative. To learn more about this offer, please contact SUSE at CCO@suse.com.

How Linux Helps the Fight Against the New Coronavirus

  • How Linux Helps the Fight Against the New Coronavirus

    As a key part of the tech world, Linux itself is playing an essential role in this fight against the new coronavirus, and today SUSE announced it’s offering free services, including the open-source operating system and container technologies, to medical device manufacturers.

    More specifically, SUSE will provide companies that produce medical devices supposed to help us deal with COVID-19 with support and maintenance for SUSE Linux Enterprise and container technologies that can be embedded into new devices.

SUSE is Offering Free Enterprise Linux Support For Medical

  • SUSE is Offering Free Enterprise Linux Support For Medical Device Manufacturers

    You are here: Home / News / SUSE is Offering Free Enterprise Linux Support For Medical Device Manufacturers
    SUSE is Offering Free Enterprise Linux Support For Medical Device Manufacturers
    Last updated March 26, 2020 By Ankush Das Leave a Comment

    Brief: SUSE is offering free support for its Linux Enterprise Server and container and cloud technologies to any organization building medical devices to fight the Coronavirus.

    SUSE is one of the biggest open-source software companies. The SUSE Linux operating system for enterprise users is their primary offering. In addition to that, they also provide container technologies.

    Amidst the COVID-19 (Coronavirus) situation, there’s a lot of things happening across the globe that keeps us worried. In times like this, SUSE’s latest commitment to fight COVID-19 is positive news!

SUSE's press release about this

  • SUSE Offers Free Operating System and Container Technologies to Medical Device Manufacturers Fighting COVID-19

    SUSE®, the world's largest independent open source software company, has made a commitment to help all organizations that are producing medical devices to fight COVID-19. To that end, SUSE is offering free services such as support and maintenance for its operating system and container technologies to be embedded in and run those medical devices. These SUSE solutions are available immediately to help speed time to market for device manufacturers.

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