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IBM/Red Hat: Red Hat Universal Base Images, OKD and OpenShift

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat Universal Base Images for Docker users

    When Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 8 was released almost a year ago, and it came with lots of new features related to containers. The biggest ones were the new container tools (Podman, Buildah, and skopeo) and the new Red Hat Universal Base Images. There was also confusion because RHEL 8 dropped support for the Docker toolset. Some developers thought that they could not work with Docker anymore, and had to either migrate to a Red Hat-ecosystem Linux system such as CentOS or stay away from Red Hat customers.

    This situation was far from the truth because containers are not just about Docker anymore. Container runtimes, container images, registry servers, and other technologies related to the Linux container ecosystem are now standardized by the Open Container Initiative (OCI). Thanks to the OCI, you can develop a container using one tool and then run the same container using another tool. For example, Red Hat builds a container image using Buildah on RHEL 8, and then you run that container image using Docker on a Windows system.

    Another example would be you building a container image using Docker on a Mac system and then later you run that container image on a Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 server with Podman.

  • Guide to Installing an OKD 4.4 Cluster on your Home Lab

    OKD is the upstream community-supported version of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP). OpenShift expands vanilla Kubernetes into an application platform designed for enterprise use at scale. Starting with the release of OpenShift 4, the default operating system is Red Hat CoreOS, which provides an immutable infrastructure and automated updates. OKD’s default operating system is Fedora CoreOS which, like OKD, is the upstream version of Red Hat CoreOS.

    Instructions for Deploying OKD 4 Beta on your Home Lab

    For those of you who have a Home Lab, check out the step-by-step guide here helps you successfully build an OKD 4.4 cluster at home using VMWare as the example hypervisor, but you can use Hyper-V, libvirt, VirtualBox, bare metal, or other platforms just as easily.

  • Bringing OpenShift to IBM Cloud with Chris Rosen (IBM)

    In this briefing, IBM Cloud’s Chris Rosen discusses the logistics of bringing OpenShift to IBM Cloud and walk us thru how to make the most of this new offering from IBM Cloud.

    Red Hat OpenShift is now available on IBM Cloud as a fully managed OpenShift service that leverages the enterprise scale and security of IBM Cloud, so you can focus on developing and managing your applications. It’s directly integrated into the same Kubernetes service that maintains 25 billion on-demand forecasts daily at The Weather Company.

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Games: Debian-Based SteamOS, Lutris 0.5.5 and Critters for Sale

  • SteamOS Isn’t Dead, Just Sidelined; Valve Has Plans To Go Back To Their Linux-Based OS

    It’s big news for any PC gamer that has been frustrated with Microsoft’s erroneous-laden grip on operating systems for as far back as 1995; with it comes a monumental blow to privacy, not to mention mere control of your PC; updates have a tendency to start when they want to, new OS licenses must be purchased if you change hardware configurations, and applications that Microsoft doesn’t want you using are notoriously finicky to get working. Of course, users can simply switch over to Linux if they have had their fill of Microsoft. That switch comes with a slew of changes, however, and dropping reliable applications is a part of the grieving process that must take place when attempting to switch over your OS. Linux does host a plethora of open-source tools that can take the place of past applications; GIMP in lieu of Photoshop, for example. Yet the old applications are never truly replaced 1 for 1; it’s more of a bandage than anything else. Even with WINE and other techniques developed over the years to help users with Linux use Windows software, there are plenty of pitfalls and inconveniences that stymie any attempts to maintain Linux over Windows.

  • Lutris 0.5.5 Linux Game Manager Adds Humble Bundle Support, Initial VKD3D Support

    Lutris 0.5.5 is out today as the newest version of this Linux game manager to assist in installing both native and emulated games on Linux. Lutris continues to expand the scope of its "runners" for improving the Linux gaming experience. While the version 0.5.5 number may not seem like a big deal, there is actually a lot to find with the Lutris 0.5.5 update. Among the changes with Lutris 0.5.5 are: - Initial support for Humble Bundle integration.

  • Try out 'Critters for Sale', an exhilarating short horror visual novel with two episodes out now

    The absolutely exhilarating short horror visual novel Critters for Sale, which was originally released the first day of 2019, had its second chapter ("Goat") available for some time (Jun 2019, actually). Considering how such a hidden gem it is I was going to write about it, but Liam ended up doing it first in this GOL article. [...] It still maintains the same fever-dream like visuals, game mechanics and layout, consisting on a left HUD with some key information, a central upper section where all the images and animations are displayed, along with some point and click elements, and finally a center lower section where you see the dialogues and options to advance the story in the available directions. However, regarding the premise, now it features other characters and a different setting, but since this is one of those games where the less you know the better, I will only say that although we're only grasping the surface of the whole mystery, and while the tone of the story still keeps a personal scope, at this point it's clear that those responsible for the plot's main threat not only have enough power to influence the entire world, but also directly encompass the whole history of mankind...

Linux Kernel: Linux 5.7, Linux Security and Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

  • AMD Sensor Fusion Hub Laptop Driver Unlikely To Land For Linux 5.7

    While we were hoping to see the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver introduced in Linux 5.7 for improving the AMD Ryzen Linux laptop experience, that now looks quite unlikely. This driver has been sought after by AMD Linux laptop customers since 2018 for supporting the accelerometer, gyroscopic sensors, and other functionality on modern AMD laptops, similar to the Intel Sensor Hub. Patches for the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub (AMD-SFH) driver for Linux were posted in January and underwent a few rounds of review.

  • Amazon Engineer's Patch For Flushing L1 Cache On Context Switching Revved

    Earlier this month there was the proposal by a Linux kernel engineer for Amazon to flush the L1 data cache on context switches as another safeguard against the ever increasing CPU vulnerabilities. The motivation for flushing the L1d cache on context switches is driven as a result of Intel's data sampling vulnerabilities and this safeguard would be an opt-in feature for those paranoid about system security. Flushing the L1 cache would ensure the data is not being snooped or leaked following a context switch but with all of the cache flushing could significantly hamper the system performance.

  • HDR Display Support Coming To Some Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

    For the very common Intel "Gen9" graphics found on pretty much all current pre-Icelake hardware that is available through retail channels, high dynamic range (HDR) display support could soon be enabled under Linux for a subset of devices.

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