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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Fedora program update 2020-12

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. I’ll be on PTO next week, so there will be no program update on 27 March.

  • No Culture Clash in the Marriage of IBM and Red Hat

    It's been nearly nine months since the marriage between IBM and Red Hat was finalized. We decided to check in and see how the newlyweds are getting along.

  • Red Hat's Peter Hutterer: It's templates all the way down

    We all know that CI/CD really helps with finding bugs early. If you don't know that yet, insert a jedi handwave before the previous sentence and now you do. GitLab is the git forge now used by freedesktop.org and it comes with a built-in CI system. I'm leaving out the difficult bits such as actually setting the thing up because this is obviously all handled by Heinzelmännchen and just readily available, hooray. I'm also going to assume that you roughly know how to write GitLab CI jobs or, failing that, at least know how to read YAML without screaming. So for this post, we start with the basic problem that your .gitlab-ci.yml is getting unwieldy, repetitive or generally just kinda sucks to maintain. Which is roughly where libinput and libevdev were a while back which caused Benjamin to start the ci-templates.

    Now, what do we want? (other than a COVID-19 cure) Reproducible tests, possibly on different distributions, with the same base system across tests. For my repos the goal was basically "test on the common distributions to catch certain bugs early". [1] For Mesa, the requirement is closer to "have a fixed set of images that 'never' change so tests are reproducible". Both goals have much in common.

  • Kogito 0.8.0 features online editors and cloud-native business automation

    Kogito is a cloud-native business automation solution that offers a powerful, developer-friendly experience. Based on production-tested open source projects Drools and jBPM, Kogito has business rules and processes down to a science. Kogito also aligns with popular lightweight runtimes such as Quarkus and Spring Boot to support developers building business-driven applications.

  • Call for Code: Water sustainability data sets

    Note: There is a webinar on March 25, 2020, organized by Agreenium (l’Institut agronomique, vétérinaire et forestier de France), UN-ESCAP (United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific), and FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) on how can we better measure and reduce post-harvest losses worldwide, especially in Southeast Asia countries. Join the webinar and share your thoughts and ideas! The webinar is at 2:30 PM (CET) and 8:30 AM US Eastern. Get more information about the webinar here. The session is the first in a series.

    [...]

    The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open data-sharing platform managed by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. In the exchange, you will find a climate change data set for each country that is derived from world bank data. The climate change data sets typically track indicators such as arable land, land under cereal production, and fertilizer consumption over a number of years. The indicators will vary from country to country, but will help you tell a story around your solution. You can find and download the climate change country data sets by selecting a location or by using the search option.

  • The 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge takes on COVID-19

    Nearly one month ago, together with Creator David Clark Cause and in partnership with United Nations Human Rights and the Linux Foundation, we announced climate change as the theme for the 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge. In that brief period, much has changed. COVID-19 (Coronavirus) has spread across the world with unprecedented effect and now has the potential to become the greatest crisis of modern times. From its inception, Call for Code was created to take on society’s most pressing issues, which is why we are expanding this year’s Challenge to address both climate change and COVID-19, two urgent crises that have the power to compromise our health, our planet, and our survival. We’re asking developers, data scientists, and problem solvers to answer the Call.

    [...]

    As previously planned, today we are revealing our 2020 Call for Code Challenge climate change starter kits (see here). These three quick-start guides explain the individual problems people and communities are facing, and help you start creating applications tied to easy-to-understand use cases in just minutes.

    To help define the specific situations caused by climate change where your innovations could be most helpful, a few weeks ago IBM partnered with the world’s leading humanitarian experts for our kickoff event in Geneva at the historic Palais Wilson, Headquarters of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Together with UN humanitarian experts, and eminent technologists from Red Hat, JP Morgan Chase, Persistent Systems, Unity Technologies, NearForm, and Johnson & Johnson, we collaborated to create our three climate change starter kits.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games: Debian-Based SteamOS, Lutris 0.5.5 and Critters for Sale

  • SteamOS Isn’t Dead, Just Sidelined; Valve Has Plans To Go Back To Their Linux-Based OS

    It’s big news for any PC gamer that has been frustrated with Microsoft’s erroneous-laden grip on operating systems for as far back as 1995; with it comes a monumental blow to privacy, not to mention mere control of your PC; updates have a tendency to start when they want to, new OS licenses must be purchased if you change hardware configurations, and applications that Microsoft doesn’t want you using are notoriously finicky to get working. Of course, users can simply switch over to Linux if they have had their fill of Microsoft. That switch comes with a slew of changes, however, and dropping reliable applications is a part of the grieving process that must take place when attempting to switch over your OS. Linux does host a plethora of open-source tools that can take the place of past applications; GIMP in lieu of Photoshop, for example. Yet the old applications are never truly replaced 1 for 1; it’s more of a bandage than anything else. Even with WINE and other techniques developed over the years to help users with Linux use Windows software, there are plenty of pitfalls and inconveniences that stymie any attempts to maintain Linux over Windows.

  • Lutris 0.5.5 Linux Game Manager Adds Humble Bundle Support, Initial VKD3D Support

    Lutris 0.5.5 is out today as the newest version of this Linux game manager to assist in installing both native and emulated games on Linux. Lutris continues to expand the scope of its "runners" for improving the Linux gaming experience. While the version 0.5.5 number may not seem like a big deal, there is actually a lot to find with the Lutris 0.5.5 update. Among the changes with Lutris 0.5.5 are: - Initial support for Humble Bundle integration.

  • Try out 'Critters for Sale', an exhilarating short horror visual novel with two episodes out now

    The absolutely exhilarating short horror visual novel Critters for Sale, which was originally released the first day of 2019, had its second chapter ("Goat") available for some time (Jun 2019, actually). Considering how such a hidden gem it is I was going to write about it, but Liam ended up doing it first in this GOL article. [...] It still maintains the same fever-dream like visuals, game mechanics and layout, consisting on a left HUD with some key information, a central upper section where all the images and animations are displayed, along with some point and click elements, and finally a center lower section where you see the dialogues and options to advance the story in the available directions. However, regarding the premise, now it features other characters and a different setting, but since this is one of those games where the less you know the better, I will only say that although we're only grasping the surface of the whole mystery, and while the tone of the story still keeps a personal scope, at this point it's clear that those responsible for the plot's main threat not only have enough power to influence the entire world, but also directly encompass the whole history of mankind...

Linux Kernel: Linux 5.7, Linux Security and Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

  • AMD Sensor Fusion Hub Laptop Driver Unlikely To Land For Linux 5.7

    While we were hoping to see the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub driver introduced in Linux 5.7 for improving the AMD Ryzen Linux laptop experience, that now looks quite unlikely. This driver has been sought after by AMD Linux laptop customers since 2018 for supporting the accelerometer, gyroscopic sensors, and other functionality on modern AMD laptops, similar to the Intel Sensor Hub. Patches for the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub (AMD-SFH) driver for Linux were posted in January and underwent a few rounds of review.

  • Amazon Engineer's Patch For Flushing L1 Cache On Context Switching Revved

    Earlier this month there was the proposal by a Linux kernel engineer for Amazon to flush the L1 data cache on context switches as another safeguard against the ever increasing CPU vulnerabilities. The motivation for flushing the L1d cache on context switches is driven as a result of Intel's data sampling vulnerabilities and this safeguard would be an opt-in feature for those paranoid about system security. Flushing the L1 cache would ensure the data is not being snooped or leaked following a context switch but with all of the cache flushing could significantly hamper the system performance.

  • HDR Display Support Coming To Some Intel Gen9 Graphics On Linux

    For the very common Intel "Gen9" graphics found on pretty much all current pre-Icelake hardware that is available through retail channels, high dynamic range (HDR) display support could soon be enabled under Linux for a subset of devices.

Android Leftovers