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LMDE 4 “Debbie” released!

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Debian

LMDE is a Linux Mint project which stands for “Linux Mint Debian Edition”. Its goal is to ensure Linux Mint would be able to continue to deliver the same user experience, and how much work would be involved, if Ubuntu was ever to disappear. LMDE is also one of our development targets, to guarantee the software we develop is compatible outside of Ubuntu.

LMDE aims to be as similar as possible to Linux Mint, but without using Ubuntu. The package base is provided by Debian instead.

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Also: Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 Released - Finally Supports SecureBoot, Home Encryption

Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 'Debbie' is here

  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 'Debbie' is here, but you don't want it

    Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 "Debbie" has finally exited Beta and is ready for download. Exciting stuff, right? I suppose. The thing is, you probably don't want it.

    Don't get me wrong, LMDE isn't really a bad operating system, but it isn't intended for widespread use. Most people should use "regular" Linux Mint, which is based on Ubuntu. This Debian variant is really just a backup distribution (a contingency plan) in case Canonical ever stops developing Ubuntu -- something that hopefully won't happen anytime soon. With all of that said, some people do run LMDE as their daily operating system for some reason.

Here's a look at what's new in Linux Mint Debian Edition 4

  • Here's a look at what's new in Linux Mint Debian Edition 4

    The Linux Mint project head, Clem Lefebvre, has officially announced the availability of Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4, just days after Neowin reported that stable builds were appearing on third-party mirrors. With today’s launch, we get a detailed list of all the new features and instructions on how to upgrade LMDE 3 installations.

    The biggest change in this update is that it’s based on Debian 10 meaning newer packages will be available to download and new hardware is supported. Other features include home directory encryption, NVMe support, SecureBoot support, support for Btrfs submodules, a new installer, improvements from Linux Mint 19.3 such as Cinnamon 4.4 and new default apps, and a few other smaller changes.

LWN Coverage

  • LMDE 4 “Debbie” released

    It is based on Debian 10 ("Buster") with lots of new features, including many improvements from Linux Mint 19.3. More information can be found in the release notes.

Linux Mint Officially Releases Debian Edition LMDE 4 “Debbie”

  • Linux Mint Officially Releases Debian Edition LMDE 4 “Debbie”

    For further improving the security of internal storage, LMDE 4 adds automated partitioning with support for LVM and full-disk encryption. You can even encrypt your home directory as well.

    Screen resolution always remains a problem while running OS in VirtualBox. Hence, the Debian edition now automatically adjusts the live session into 1024×768 resolution.

    Among the bug fixes, one of the most important improvements is the compatibility of Nouveau driver with NVIDIA cards. If you’ve ever faced a black screen during OS booting, it must be because of NVIDIA driver. But, you can now boot using a new boot option that installs NVIDIA drivers on the fly.

Linux Mint’s Debian Variant LMDE 4 Released With New Features

  • Linux Mint’s Debian Variant LMDE 4 Released With New Features and Improvements

    Brief: Linux Mint’s Debian variant LMDE 4 has been released with Debian 10 Buster as the base. Check out what’s new feature this new release brings.

    Most people know that Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu but not many people know that Linux Mint also has Debian-based variant. It is called LMDE which stands for Linux Mint Debian Edition.

LMDE 4 Debbie Run Through

LMDE 4 “Debbie” released, adds support to SecureBoot, NVMe

  • LMDE 4 “Debbie” released, adds support to SecureBoot, NVMe

    The newest update to the Linux Mint Debian Edition is finally here. Before we get to discussing the latest improvements in LMDE 4, let’s shed some light on what this software is all about.

    The LMDE project aims to reduce Linux Mint’s dependency on Ubuntu by giving the users a similar user experience. In simpler terms, this version of Linux Mint isn’t based on Ubuntu but looks very similar to the original version that is.

    The Mint team also pays close attention to this project since it helps to make sure that their developed software runs even without Ubuntu. So, if you want to have a taste of Linux Mint that’s based on Debian and doesn’t have anything to do with Ubuntu, then you should consider having a look at LMDE.

Linux Mint Debian Edition – LMDE 4 Debbie

  • Linux Mint Debian Edition – LMDE 4 Debbie

    Cool! I didn't even know Linux Mint have a Debian Edition, so LMDE 4 Debbie released last Friday is a great opportunity to explore this.

    I will try it in VirtualBox first, and expect to reinstall my Dell XPS 9380 laptop – right after I complete XPS post-configuration in Ansible.

Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 “Debbie” Released

  • Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 “Debbie” Released, This Is What’s New

    Coming one and a half years after LMDE 3 “Cindy,” the Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 “Debbie” release is here to provide the Linux Mint community with an up-to-date installation media for easier deployment of the Debian-based Linux Mint operating system.

    Based on the Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series, Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 comes packed with all the latest software updates and security patches released upstream, along with several new features and improvements.

LMDE 4 Has Been Released

  • LMDE 4 Has Been Released

    The latest version of the Linux Mint Debian Edition based on Debian 10 'Buster' has been released. You can find the release announcement here with a link to release notes for more information, and if already running LMDE 3 upgrade instructions here. This is quite an important release and a nice way to install Debian on your machines that is less bloated and more responsive than the mainline Mint base.

[Older] Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 available

  • [Older] Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 available for download

    At the time of writing, the Linux Mint project is still to announce the release of Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 but if you check out mirror services, you can grab the new version right now. The new update brings improvements that were shipped with Linux Mint 19.3 such as Cinnamon 4.4, new default software, a boot repair tool, and more.

    According to the ISO status page, the 32- and 64-bit LMDE 4 images were approved for stable release in that last several hours. While no announcement has been made, you can download them by heading to the Linux Mint mirrors page, selecting a mirror, heading into the debian folder and looking for LMDE 4. If you cannot see the ISO in the mirror you chose, just look on another mirror and you should find a download link.

Linux Mint releases Linux Mint 4 Debian Edition

  • Linux Mint releases Linux Mint 4 Debian Edition

    The popular Linux distribution Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu but the developers are maintaining a side-project that bases the Linux distribution on Debian instead.

    There are several reasons for that: first, because it provides them with an option if Ubuntu would no longer be maintained, disappear, or be turned into a commercial application. Second, because it provides Linux Mint developers with an opportunity to test Linux Mint software designed specifically for the distribution using another Linux distribution that is not based on Ubuntu.

    The developers of Linux Mint have released LMDE 4, Linux Mint Debian Edition 4, last week.

screenFetch in LMDE4

  • screenFetch in LMDE4

    Got that Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 installed on my Dell XPS laptop, and it looks and feels amazing!

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