Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenCola - Open Source Coca Cola

Filed under
Misc

If you’ve been to a computer show in recent months you might have seen it: a shiny silver drink can with a ring-pull logo and the words “opencola” on the side. Inside is a fizzy drink that tastes very much like Coca-Cola. Or is it Pepsi?There’s something else written on the can, though, which sets the drink apart. It says “check out the source at opencola.com.” Go to that Web address and you’ll see something that’s not available on Coca-Cola’s website, or Pepsi’s — the recipe for cola. For the first time ever, you can make the real thing in your own home.

Although originally intended as a promotional tool to explain open source software, the drink has taken on a life of its own. Anybody can make the drink, and anyone can modify and improve on the recipe as long as they, too, license their recipe under the GNU General Public License.

More Here.


Also:

When the name of your product is Free Beer, the jokes are inevitable. And for the group of Danish students and artists who came up with Free Beer, that's part of the point, but only part. Because while the name of their beer is meant to be playful, the point they are trying to make with it is a rather sophisticated one.

Free Beer is an honest-to-god beer, but one based on a concept that has its roots in the free software movement. "Free software" began in the early 1980s when software developers first started asserting intellectual property rights over their works. The problem wasn't so much that developers were making money off software, but rather that, by asserting these rights, they were no longer allowing the free and informal sharing of code. The free software movement's objection, which was largely cast in moral terms, was essentially that while charging money for software was fine -- everyone has to eat -- it is not right to prevent others from using, studying, distributing, or improving on it.

Free Beer.

More in Tux Machines

Top 5 Best Alternative Linux Distributions for Windows 10 Users

Also check out the following articles to find out about our top Linux distributions of the year 2015 and 2016. Read more

Open Source Elections System: Update from City & County of San Francisco, California USA

The OSI has has voiced our support to recent efforts by the City and County of San Francisco's Department of Elections to develop an open source voting system. The following is an update provided to the OSI from Commissioner and Vice President of the Elections Commission, Chris Jerdonek. Read more

Developers Still Hoping For AMD DAL Support In Linux 4.7

Open-source developers working on the Radeon Linux graphics driver stack remain hopeful that their massive "DAL" code-base will be ready for merging with Linux 4.7. DAL is the massive proposed addition to the AMDGPU DRM driver and is a lot of code opened up from the Catalyst proprietary driver. This display abstraction code is AMD's approach for implementing atomic mode-setting, DP MST, HDMI 2.0, better PowerPlay, better multi-display support, etc. It will also allow them to hopefully implement FreeSync support in their Linux driver. Read more

Review: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus)

When we get to our Conclusion, we always find recent Ubuntu releases a little difficult to summarize. This is probably because each new release does not really bring major changes to the table anymore, rather they all seem to feel like just another update. In truth, that’s all they really are. But when third-party Linux distributions continue to innovate and give their users something fresh each time a new release is delivered, we can’t help but wonder why Ubuntu Developers can not achieve the same. Yet we can not quite put our finger on what Canonical are doing wrong. Essentially, they’re not really doing anything wrong. They are just not really offering anything fresh, new or innovative anymore. Read more