Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OpenCola - Open Source Coca Cola

Filed under
Misc

If you’ve been to a computer show in recent months you might have seen it: a shiny silver drink can with a ring-pull logo and the words “opencola” on the side. Inside is a fizzy drink that tastes very much like Coca-Cola. Or is it Pepsi?There’s something else written on the can, though, which sets the drink apart. It says “check out the source at opencola.com.” Go to that Web address and you’ll see something that’s not available on Coca-Cola’s website, or Pepsi’s — the recipe for cola. For the first time ever, you can make the real thing in your own home.

Although originally intended as a promotional tool to explain open source software, the drink has taken on a life of its own. Anybody can make the drink, and anyone can modify and improve on the recipe as long as they, too, license their recipe under the GNU General Public License.

More Here.


Also:

When the name of your product is Free Beer, the jokes are inevitable. And for the group of Danish students and artists who came up with Free Beer, that's part of the point, but only part. Because while the name of their beer is meant to be playful, the point they are trying to make with it is a rather sophisticated one.

Free Beer is an honest-to-god beer, but one based on a concept that has its roots in the free software movement. "Free software" began in the early 1980s when software developers first started asserting intellectual property rights over their works. The problem wasn't so much that developers were making money off software, but rather that, by asserting these rights, they were no longer allowing the free and informal sharing of code. The free software movement's objection, which was largely cast in moral terms, was essentially that while charging money for software was fine -- everyone has to eat -- it is not right to prevent others from using, studying, distributing, or improving on it.

Free Beer.

More in Tux Machines

Mesa 10.3 released

Mesa 10.3 has been released! Mesa 10.3 is a feature release that includes many updates and enhancements. The full list is available in the release notes file in docs/relnotes/10.3.html. The tag in the GIT repository for Mesa 10.3 is 'mesa-10.3'. I have verified that the tag is in the correct place in the tree. Mesa 10.3 is available for download at ftp://freedesktop.org/pub/mesa/10.3/ Read more

Tizen Development Units now available!

The Linux Foundation have today announced the next round of the Tizen development unit program is now available, with the Intel NUC and Samsung RD-PQ hardware devices being available. The Idea behind this program is to put the required hardware in developers hands so they can develop and test their applications on real hardware. It has to be noted that the Samsung RD-PQ device does not have GSM connectivity, and therefore can not be used as a real world device, which is a pity as developers do need real devices so late in the game. Read more

Smittix’s Top 5 GNOME Shell Extensions

GNOME Shell’s ability to have extensions is pretty brilliant in my eyes. Some developers have come up with some great extensions to make life easier within GNOME-Shell. To install these extensions easily just open the links up within firefox, you will get a message bar asking if you would like to allow extensions.gnome.org to install them. You need to allow this for them to work. When you load one of the extension links you will be presented with a page like below, it has a nice easy “On/Off” toggle switch. Read more

Open source and the NHS: Two huge disorganised entities without central control

Newton argues open source is well suited to systems that need to be transparently stable and secure, where a lot of people have an interest in collaborating. He adds it is favoured by intelligence services for exactly these reasons, and if it’s good enough for spooks, it should serve for hospitals. Alfresco hit its initial end-of-year download target of 10,000 in the first week, with eventual downloads numbering in the millions for the initial release of its software in 2005. “You want to join the cool party,” Mr Newton said. “That’s what open source is all about.” Read more