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Voting and Petitioning With Proprietary Software

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OSS
  • Voters struggled with LA’s fancy new voting machines on Super Tuesday

    Jennifer Cohn, an attorney and election integrity advocate, aggregated at least 100 social media or news reports related to the new voting system. They’re all bad.

    [...]

    It’s all supposed to be high tech, but the system has been showing some low-tech flaws since it debuted earlier this year. In late February, during California’s early voting period, CBS reported that some of the new voting machines were going unused because of issues with equipment, and that about 30 out of 229 total locations didn’t open on time because of issues with the tech.

  • On Super Tuesday, America's voting technology will be under intense scrutiny

    While election technology will continue to evolve to meet new threats, Heikki Nousiainen, CTO of the open-source technology company Aiven, said that companies hoping to safeguard the process will always have to split the difference between verifying a vote and protecting the voter's anonymity. He suggested that an open-source model could help achieve this.

  • Boulder makes strides toward online petitions for 2021 election

    Council, on the whole, agreed that open-source may not be the way to go for elections-related systems. (Open-source software was not a criteria in the Request for Proposals.)

    “With elections stuff, you want to move slowly and include a lot of security,” said councilman Aaron Brockett, a software industry professional “I think we’re on the right path.”

    Two council members, Adam Swetlik and Rachel Friend, wanted to issue a new RFP, due to what they saw as a lack of transparency during the lass process. City leaders convened what Carr called a “courtesy” meeting of the disbanded Campaign Finance/Elections Working Group to update them on the process and gather input.

  • Boulder Council minority skeptical of online petitioning system’s development process

    MapLight produced two “open source” systems, in which the programming code for the petitioning software can be accessed by the public and scrutinized and updated, but those were built outside the formal city bidding process. When MapLight responded to the city’s request, the offer was not for free development, according to a city staff memo to the council.

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  • TenFourFox FPR23 available

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