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GNOME: New GTK Site, GNOME 3.36 Lands Scaled/Transformed Hardware Cursors Support, Felipe Borges Celebrates 10

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GNOME
  • GNOME launches a new GTK site, the Linux Foundation on security vulnerabilities, OSI board elections, and more open source news

    Developers of apps will be delighted with the facelift to the GTK website. The new site integrates a complete set of documentation for anyone developing applications to run in a GNOME desktop environment. One of the major successes is its extensive documentation in multiple programming languages, letting developers have more choice than ever according to the site. The whole site is available on GitLab and you can see the recent commits that led to the new look.

  • GNOME 3.36 Lands Scaled/Transformed Hardware Cursors Support

    Landing just in time for GNOME 3.36 is a merge request that has been open for nearly one year on improving Mutter's hardware cursor handling.

    Hitting Mutter today ahead of GNOME 3.36 is support for scaling and transforming cursor images with Cairo and using hardware cursors on rotated or fractionally scaled displays.

  • Felipe Borges: Ten Years Contributing to GNOME!

    I rarely celebrate recurring dates but this is a nice rounded number that serves as the perfect excuse for me to publish this letter of appreciation to our community.

    For me, it all started with a hardware vendor trying to cheap their desktop machine’s price by putting Linux on it. Initially, we didn’t have internet at home, so I spent a significant amount of time just exploring the OS and toggling every knob I could find in the UI. The first issues I encountered were missing translations. Googling for that lead me to discover the wonders of Free and Open Source Software. I could contribute that missing translation!

    Playing with computers wasn’t always my hobby. I had an offline childhood, despite being a 90’s kid. A career in anything computer-related was unthinkable given our economic reality at the time. My parents are low paid public servants, so I was inclined to find myself a job in the public sector too. I had strong feelings about teaching, just like my mom, but computers… well, they are addictive!

    When I was sixteen years old I made my first contributions to the Brazilian Portuguese translation team in GNOME. This was also when I started reading Planet GNOME. Your neckless floating heads were god-like figures to me. I couldn’t understand 90% of the topics discussed due to my limited English and technical skills at the time, but I basically just kept on reading everything. Really. IRC logs, mailing lists, blog aggregators, social media timelines… everything scrolled all the way to the bottom. This is indeed overwhelming, but it has helped me put everything together and ~kind of~ grasp what software development looked like.

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