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Games: Dwarrows, SteamVR and Ring Fit Adventure

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  • Very sweet 3rd person city-building adventure 'Dwarrows' is out now

    With colourful visuals, super happy music and a family-friendly atmosphere, Dwarrows has officially launched with Linux support today powered by Unreal Engine from Lithic Entertainment. Note: Key provided to us by the developer.

    Another title successfully launched after crowdfunding, with their Kickstarter being a success back in 2016 (see more projects here). Lithic managed to gather about fifteen thousand Canadian Dollars, and after the wait is it worth it? Well, it's certainly nothing like I expected and that's a really good thing—it's quite wonderful. Not serious at all and full of charm.

  • Valve reveals SteamVR 1.10 with a brand new Dashboard

    Valve continue rapidly iterating on SteamVR, as they attempt to push the limits of what VR can do both on the hardware and software side with SteamVR 1.10 out now. Not a Beta release either, a proper new version.

    Quite a big update too, giving a huge revamp to the Dashboard that Valve claim "gets you into your games quickly". It has a new curved design that's closer for increased clarity, and presents a recent games list for jumping in right away. Looks pretty nice too.

  • Diving into the world of Ring Fit Adventure

    Continuing with my Ring Fit Adventure adventure1, these are the first full two weeks of working out with Ring Fit Adventure.

    My plan is to work our every work day, but this weekend I could not stop myself from trying out a few more mini-games. On the other hand, I skipped two days, but felt bad and missed the routine.

    Anyway, onwards with the adventure²!

MoonQuest Available now on PC, macOS, and Linux for $19.99 USD

DWARROWS RELEASES TODAY for Windows, Mac, and Linux

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Star Lite Mk III and Purism GNU/Linux Laptops

  • Star Lite Mk III Linux Laptop Is Now Available for Pre-Order from Star Labs

    Star Labs just informed me today that they’ve launched the pre-orders for the lightweight Star Lite Mk III Linux laptop from only $428 USD. Featuring a lightweight design with a redesigned chassis, the Star Lite MK III Linux laptop features an 11.6-inch LED-backlit Arc IPS matte display with Full HD (1920×1080) resolution and 16:9 aspect ration, which users offers glare-free viewing thanks to the a hard coat that also boasts durability. Under the hood, the Linux laptop is powered by a 1.1GHz Quad-Core Intel Pentium Silver N5000 processor that can go as high as 2.7GHz when boosted and promises up to 29% performance increase. It also features 8GB 2400MHz LPDDR4 RAM for up to 33% faster memory. It also features Intel UHD 605 graphics, a fanless design, a smoother glass trackpad, improved audio system, backlit keyboard, as well as an ultra-fast 240GB over-provisioned Star Drive SSD with up to 560MB/s read speeds and up to 540MB/s write speeds.

  • The next generation of the Purism Linux laptop is on its way

    For most Linux desktop users who want a ready-to-run Linux laptop, I recommend the latest high-end Dell XPS 13. I can also suggest System76 or ZaReason PCs or laptops for those who want top-of-the-line Linux hardware. But if privacy, security, and free software are at the top of your "Want" list, then you should check out Purism, maker of free software and Linux-powered laptops, and its next-generation Librem 14 laptop.

Mozilla: Firefox Startup Cache, Security of Passwords, and Servo

  • Improving Firefox Startup Time With The about:home Startup Cache

    We’re working on a thing to make Firefox start faster! It appears to work! Here’s a video showing off a before (left) and after (right): Improving Firefox Startup Time With The about:home Startup Cache For the past year or so, the Firefox Desktop Front-End Performance team has been concentrating on making improvements to browser startup performance. The launching of an application like Firefox is quite complex. Meticulous profiling of Firefox startup in various conditions has, thankfully, helped reveal a number of opportunities where we can make improvements. We’ve been evaluating and addressing these opportunities, and several have made it into the past few Firefox releases. This blog post is about one of those improvements that is currently in the later stages of development. I’m going to describe the improvement, and how we went about integrating it. In a default installation of Firefox, the first (and only) tab that loads is about:home.

  • A look at password security, Part II: Web Sites

    In part I, we took a look at the design of password authentication systems for old-school multiuser systems. While timesharing is mostly gone, most of us continue to use multiuser systems; we just call them Web sites. In this post, I’ll be covering some of the problems of Web authentication using passwords. As I discussed previously, the strength of passwords depends to a great extent on how fast the attacker can try candidate passwords. The nature of a Web application inherently limits the velocity at which you can try passwords quite a bit. Even ignoring limits on the rate which you can transmit stuff over the network, real systems — at least well managed ones — have all kinds of monitoring software which is designed to detect large numbers of login attempts, so just trying millions of candidate passwords is not very effective. This doesn’t mean that remote attacks aren’t possible: you can of course try to log in with some of the obvious passwords and hope you get lucky, and if you have a good idea of a candidate password, you can try that (see below), but this kind of attack is inherently somewhat limited. [...] Leaked passwords aren’t the only threat to password authentication on Web sites. The other big issue is what’s called phishing. In the basic phishing attack, the attacker sends you an e-mail inviting you to log into your account. Often this will be phrased in some scary way like telling you your account will be deleted if you don’t log in immediately. The e-mail will helpfully contain a link to use to log in, but of course this link will go not to the real site but to the attacker’s site, which will usually look just like the real site and may even have a similar domain name (e.g., mozi11a.com instead of mozilla.com). When the user clicks on the link and logs in, the attacker captures their username and password and can then log into the real site. Note that having users use good passwords totally doesn’t help here because the user gives the site their whole password. Preventing phishing has proven to be a really stubborn challenge because, well, people are not as suspicious as they should be and it’s actually fairly hard on casual examination to determine whether you are on the right site. Most modern browsers try to warn users if they are going to known phishing sites (Firefox uses the Google Safe Browsing service for this). In addition, if you use a password manager, then it shouldn’t automatically fill in your password on a phishing site because password managers key off of the domain name and just looking similar isn’t good enough. Of course, both of these defenses are imperfect: the lists of phishing sites can be incomplete and if users don’t use password managers or are willing to manually cut and paste their passwords, then phishing attacks are still possible

  • This Week In Servo 132

    In the past week, we merged 64 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories. The latest nightly builds for common platforms are available at download.servo.org.

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