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Programming: 'DevOps', Caddyfile, GCC 8.4 RC and Forth

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  • A beginner's guide to everything DevOps

    While there is no single definition, I consider DevOps to be a process framework that ensures collaboration between development and operations teams to deploy code to production environments faster in a repeatable and automated way. We will spend the rest of this article unpacking that statement.

    The word "DevOps" is an amalgamation of the words "development" and "operations." DevOps helps increase the speed of delivering applications and services. It allows organizations to serve their customers efficiently and become more competitive in the market. In simple terms, DevOps is an alignment between development and IT operations with better communication and collaboration.

    DevOps assumes a culture where collaboration among the development, operations, and business teams is considered a critical aspect of the journey. It's not solely about the tools, as DevOps in an organization creates continuous value for customers. Tools are one of its pillars, alongside people and processes. DevOps increases organizations' capability to deliver high-quality solutions at a swift pace. It automates all processes, from build to deployment, of an application or a product.

  • How to solve the DevOps vs. ITSM culture clash

    Since its advent, DevOps has been pitted against IT service management (ITSM) and its ITIL framework. Some say "ITIL is under siege," some ask you to choose sides, while others frame them as complementary. What is true is that both DevOps and ITSM have fans and detractors, and each method can influence software delivery and overall corporate culture.

  • JFrog Launches JFrog Multi-Cloud Universal DevOps Platform

    DevOps technology company JFrog has announced its new hybrid, multi-cloud, universal DevOps platform called the JFrog Platform that drives continuous software releases from any source to any destination. By delivering tools in an all-in-one solution, the JFrog Platform aims to empower organizations, developers and DevOps engineers to meet increased delivery requirements.

    For the uninitiated, JFrog is the creator of Artifactory, the heart of the Universal DevOps platform for automating, managing, securing, distributing, and monitoring all types of technologies.

  • New Caddyfile and more

    The new Caddyfile enables experimental HTTP3 support. Also I’ve added a few redirects to my new domain. All www prefix requests get redirected to their version without www prefix. My old domain nullday.de redirects now to my new domain shibumi.dev. Also I had to add connect-src 'self' to my CSP, because Google Lighthouse seems to have problems with defalt-src 'none'. If just default-src 'none' is being set, Google Lighthouse can’t access your robot.txt. This seems to be an issue in the Google Lighthouse implementation, the Google Search Bot is not affected.

  • Content Addressed Vocabulary

    How can systems communicate and share meaning? Communication within systems is preceded by a form of meta-communication; we must have a sense that we mean the same things by the terms we use before we can even use them.

    This is challenging enough for humans who must share meaning, but we can resolve ambiguities with context clues from a surrounding narrative. Machines, in general, need a context more explicitly laid out for them, with as little ambiguity as possible.

    Standards authors of open-world systems have long struggled with such systems and have come up with some reasonable systems; unfortunately these also suffer from several pitfalls. With minimal (or sometimes none at all) adjustment to our tooling, I propose a change in how we manage ontologies.

  • GCC 8.4 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 8.4 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/8.4.0-RC-20200226/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/8.4.0-RC-20200226/
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git commit
    r8-10091-gf80c40f93f9e8781b14f1a8301467f117fd24051.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 8.4 on Wednesday, March 4th.
    
  • GCC 8.4 RC Compiler Released For Testing

    GCC 8.4 will hopefully be released next week but for now a release candidate is available for testing the latest bug fixes in the mature GCC8 series.

    GCC 8.4 is aiming for release next week as potentially the last of the GCC8 series while GCC 9.3 is also coming soon. GCC 8.4 represents all of the relevant bug fixes over the past year for back-porting to users still on GCC 8. GCC 10 (in the form of version GCC 10.1) meanwhile as the next feature release should be out in the next month or two.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Forth

    Forth is an imperative stack-based programming language, and a member of the class of extensible interactive languages. It was created by Charles Moore in 1970 to control telescopes in observatories using small computers. Because of its roots, Forth stresses efficiency, compactness, flexible and efficient hardware/software interaction.

    Forth has a number of properties that contrast it from many other programming languages. In particular, Forth has no inherent keywords and is extensible. It is both a low level and high level language. It has the interesting property of being able to compile itself into a new compiler, debug itself and to experiment in real time as the system is built. Forth is an extremely flexible language, with high portability, compact source and object code, and a language that is easy to learn, program and debug. It has an incremental compiler, an interpreter and a very fast edit-compile-test cycle. Forth uses a stack to pass data between words, and it uses the raw memory for more permanent storage. It also lets coders write their own control structures.

    Forth has often being deployed in embedded systems due to the compactness of object code. Forth is also used in boot loaders such as Open Firmware (developed by Sun Microsystems) as well as scientific fields such as astronomy, mathematics, oceanography and electrical engineering.

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Games: The Universim, Zoria: Age of Shattering, Quiplash 2 InterLASHional, Plastris, Something Ate My Alien, Gutwhale

  • City-builder god sim 'The Universim' has a massive update with bridges and pretty towerblocks

    The Universim from Crytivo continues pushing through Early Access updates, towards an eventual release later this year. A massive update is out now, which amongst other things adds in some fancy bridges to build. Crytivo's aim with The Universim is to create what they're calling a "a new breed of God Game", to bring in features from some classic with a modern physics engine and blending in a city-builder. So far, so good. You can build a big beautiful city across an entire planet, and guide your Nuggets a little with various god powers. It oozes charm and the narrator brings some nice comedic value to it. The latest update is another step forward in the overall content available. While bridges are a great (and needed) addition to the game, personally I'm more excited about the huge Residential overhaul. From the Stone Age to the Modern Age, there's a huge amount more variety in the buildings where your little Nuggets reside. It gives the game that bit more character to it.

  • Party-based RPG with base management 'Zoria: Age of Shattering' now has a Linux demo available

    Tiny Trinket Games emailed to mention their upcoming party-based RPG, Zoria: Age of Shattering, now has a Linux demo available for you to try out right now. A story-driven, party-based RPG that will have a focus on "strong" tactical elements with turn-based battles that have free movement rather than tiles, plus base and follower management. Taking place in the fantasy world of Zoria, a world filled with magic, ancient history, tumultuous politics, and countless mysteries. Tiny Trinket are promising something interesting too, with it being hand-crafted adventuring with multiple branching paths.

  • Jackbox Games goes global with Quiplash 2 InterLASHional out now, we have a few keys to give away

    Quiplash 2 InterLASHional is the first time Jackbox Games have attempted to go global, with this being their first fully localized party game. For English speakers, it's basically the same as Quiplash 2 found in The Jackbox Party Pack 3 but expanding the languages is vitally important for a game developer since it's one of the best ways to expand their reach. Obviously that's good for people want to play where English isn't their best language, a wonderful bit of "quality of life". Now it's available in English, French, Italian, German, and Spanish with a bunch of extra content for each language.

  • Plastris is a 'hyper casual' puzzle game with a wonderful style out now on Linux

    Plastris from developer Khud0 is a 'hyper casual' puzzle game, where all you need to do is fill all the tiles on the screen with simple clicks and it's so weirdly satisfying. Releasing in March 2020, with Linux support arriving a few days ago. I decided to picked up a personal copy, since it's only £1.69. I will admit, the term 'hyper casual' is a new one to me. Turns out, it's a thing, and a term that came into light a few years ago with a new breed of casual mobile games. All you're doing is clicking, and filling. However, you're given a very specific fill-shape, so you also need to use the mouse right-click to remove some you've filled, to be able to complete each level. That's it. Hyper casual? Yeah, sure is. The main thing is how super accessible they are and Plastris is certainly that.

  • Something Ate My Alien has a curious mixture of action, digging and puzzle platforming - demo up

    Something Ate My Alien is now confirmed to be launching in June, although there's no exact date they at least have a release window now for their intriguing gameplay mix of action, platforming, puzzles and digging. There's also now a demo. In Something Ate My Alien, you're tasked with digging through different worlds to find all the items required for the pirate who hijacked your mining ship. During the adventure on each planet you have to battle environmental dangers, fight off wildlife, solve secret puzzle chambers, and all this while surviving on a depleting oxygen supply and a threat far scarier than the local wildlife.

  • Gutwhale is a claustrophobic 'finite roguelite' action game taking place in a digestive system

    Taking place entirely in a digestive system, Gutwhale is a 'finite roguelite' action game about managing your limited ammo in a very cramped space. Stuffed Wombat, the developer, said the only reason the game actually exists is that they were fired from their job due to Coronavirus so they took it as the perfect opportunity to finally release a game with help from Franek and Britt Brady. [...] Currently, the Linux and macOS versions are only available on itch.io as they haven't had enough testing. I've played it for a good while today and it's a lot of fun and very challenging. Works perfectly with keyboard input, although one button prompt on the Logitech F310 gamepad was wrong as it says B to respawn when it's X. Apart from that, it does work great!

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