Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: The Linux Link Tech Show, FLOSS Weekly, Linux Headlines and Arch/Manjaro

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 846

    nodejs 12, raspberry pi, 3d printing, air frying

  • FLOSS Weekly 567: DeepCode

    DeepCode alerts you about critical vulnerabilities you need to solve in your code. DeepCode finds critical vulnerabilities that other automated code reviews don't, such as Cross-Site Scripting, Path Traversal or SQL injection. DeepCode finds critical vulnerabilities that other automated code reviews don't, such as Cross-Site Scripting, Path Traversal or SQL injection with 90% precision.

  • 2020-02-26 | Linux Headlines

    Brave joins forces with the Wayback Machine, the Linux Foundation teams up with IBM to fight climate change, and The Document Foundation puts out a call to the community.

  • Linux Apps I Use At Work

    Linux Apps I Use At Work This video will go over all the applications I use on my Work PC. I go over my email, file browser, and many other features. As a life long Windows user, I was able to optimize my workflow once I moved to Linux and pick up a lot of productivity.

  • Manjaro 19.0 KDE Plasma Edition overview | #FREE OPERATING SYSTEM.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Manjaro Linux 19.0 KDE Plasma Edition and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Manjaro 19.0 XFCE Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Manjaro 19.0 XFCE.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 62: Sort Email Addresses

    Write a script that takes a list of email addresses (one per line) and sorts them first by the domain part of the email address, and then by the part to the left of the @ (known as the mailbox). Note that the domain is case-insensitive, while the mailbox part is case sensitive. (Some email providers choose to ignore case, but that’s another matter entirely.) If your script is invoked with arguments, it should treat them as file names and read them in order, otherwise your script should read email addresses from standard input.

  • XSD2Go - Automatically generate golang xml parsers

    Most of my readers will probably have an experience with the wide spread XML applications like RSS or Atom feeds, SVG, XHTML. For those well known XML applications you will find good library encapsulating the parsing for you. You just include existing parser in your project and you are done with it. However, what would you do if you cannot use it (think of license mismatch), or what would you do if there was no parsing library at all? There are many XML applications around. Here comes a (probably incomplete) list of XML formats, I had to touch in my past life: Atom, DocBook, Office Open XML, OpenDocument (ODF), OSCAL, Rolie, RSS, SAML, SCAP (+dozens of sub-formats), SOAP, SVG, XMPP, Epub, WS-Policy, XHTML, XSLT.

  • 8 IT jobs in flux

    If there’s one universal piece of advice for IT professionals, it’s “don’t get too comfortable.” The role or project you were hired for may quickly evolve or even become obsolete as the technology landscape changes. Your important title, such as scrum master or agile team lead, may lose its prestige if your organization someday gives up on agile practices. In the ever-evolving IT industry, it’s up to individuals to stay adaptable. It’s also up to leaders to help each person on the team recognize the value they bring to the organization outside of their job description – and to reallocate, re-organize, and re-imagine talent as appropriate.

  • What is Deno? | AWS Open Source Blog

    Deno’s approach to ES Modules is generating a lot of debate around package management, especially concerning security. For example, will this prevent another left-pad incident? Regardless of your gut reaction, I highly recommend reading the docs. I think the explicitness of import-from-URL will make developers think carefully about dependency management; however, I suspect many teams will handle this problem similarly to how they handle npm: with lock files, proxies, and white-listed internal registries.

  • drat 0.1.6: Rewritten macOS binary support

    A new version of drat arrived on CRAN overnight, once again taking advantage of the fully automated process available for such packages with few reverse depends and no open issues. As we remarked at the last release fourteen months ago when we scored the same nice outcome: Being a simple package can have its upsides…

  • Stack Overfow Developer Survey 2020

    Ruby is now in consistent decline, I have read people linking this to Twitter moving away from Ruby on Rails. My observation is that Ruby on Rails seems to have gone out of fashion in favor of lightweight server frameworks and I would suggest that Kubernetes has sidelined Puppet, so organizations aren't bring in Ruby via apps/frameworks they want to use. I am curious that the Hack language (from Facebook) might be splitting the PHP community whilst PHP's killer apps are being eroded. Wordpress is still hugely popular, but in generally I observe that blogs have been replaced by social media (Facebook, Medium, etc), rather than running Wikimedia organizations seem in love with Confluence, and that SMB company websites are being captured by WIX, Shopify et al. Wikimedia was using HHVM but is not following it to Hack and Box had success with HHVM but I can't find any update. I think that Go is taking share from Python and somewhat Java. Google itself is using Go internally which radiates outwards in terms of mindshare of their alumni. A range of software written in Go is currently vogue (Kubernetes, Docker etc Although Docker seem to have stumbled with Docker Swarm and Redhat is shipping their own) which means it will be in organizations via that software.

  • The 14 most loved programming languages, according to a study of 65,000 developers
  • Converting snake_case keys to camelCase in Elixir

    Converting a snake_case map keys to camelCase is a pretty common task in the snake-case-style languages working with the JavaScript frontend. Here are the basics in understanding how you can convert maps to camelCase style in Elixir.

Games: Newer Windows Games On Wine, Steam on Chrome OS and Soldat's Source Code

  • A New Kernel Patch Is Being Discussed That's Needed For Newer Windows Games On Wine

    Newer Windows games/applications are making use of system call instructions from the application code without resorting to the WinAPI and that is breaking Wine emulation support. A Linux kernel patch is now being worked on for addressing this issue in the form of system call isolation based on memory areas while having a smaller performance hit than alternatives. With newer Windows software executing system call instructions without going through the Windows API, Wine isn't able to intercept and emulate those system calls and thus breaking the support. Wine can't really rework its handling of every system call as that would thrash the performance. So a Linux kernel-based solution is being sorted out.

  • Cloud FTW: Steam on Chrome OS may not look like we thought

    Back in January, word got out that Google and Valve were collaborating to bring some form of native Steam client to Chrome OS. Director of Product Management Kan Liu told Android Police that the project would leverage Crostini, aka Linux on Chrome OS. Because I spend a good portion of my days tinkering with Linux on my Chromebook, I hastily presumed that Steam would be delivered in some sort of Chrome OS-optimized Linux package. While that could still be a possibility, it appears that Valve may look to the Clouds in Steam’s next evolution.

  • Soldat source code released and a story of how it all started

KDE Development: Adriaan de Groot and New GSoC Students

  • Timezones, yes please

    One of the bits of Calamares that I think is most terrible is the timezone selector. So I was very happy to read Volker’s ideas about timezone-mapping. Calamares is a universal Linux installer, used by some dozens of Linux distro’s. It is built as a framework, customizable by downstreams to their liking. This is basically a service to the small-distro Linux community, and PRs are very welcome .. but I digress. Part of installation is picking a timezone to put the system in. Calamares offers a map, and you click on it, and it picks a likely location, and off you go. The technology used is simple: there’s a PNG for each timezone (this sounds familiar). The user clicks on the PNG of the world map, and the mouse coordinates are mapped to a location (longitude and latitude), the location is mapped to a zone offset that gets mapped to a timezone image, and the image is drawn.

  • The Community Bonding Period Ends

    It has been almost a month, since the commencement of community bonding period and the phase was mostly good. I spent most of my time lurking over the IRC in passive reconnaissance mode, force of habit I mostly speak less and I know it is not a good one especially being part of an open-source community. I used to attend all the meetings and tried to get accustomed with the workflow of the community and got to know about everything hot and spicy that is taking place whether it is Krita finally on android or new contributors working on some bugs.

  • KDE Conference India 2020: A very late post

    KDE India Conference 2020 was successfully organized in Maharaja Agrasen Institute of Technology. It was a three-day event, from Jan 17 to Jan 19. There were talks about Libre, Open Source Software and how software is developed using C++ and the Qt Framework. Hands-on workshops were also organized on C++, Qt and QML which gave attendees a good start on how to start their journey with C++ and Qt Framework. The conference was able to educate 200+ attendees throughout the conference. Refreshments were provided to all present for the conference on all 3 days. Every day of the conference concluded with dinner at various good places in Delhi with all the speakers, organizers and volunteers.

  • About me, who am I?

    I am Shubham, a final year undergraduate student, pursuing B.E(Bachelor of Engineering) at BMS Institute of Technology and Management, Bangalore, India. I am an open source enthusiast and developer, mostly working with C++ with Qt framework. I also have decent knowledge of C, Java, Python, bash scripting, git and I love developing under linux environment. Previously I was selected as one of many GSoC students to be mentored by this amazing organization, which is KDE. This year also, I applied again to KDE as a student and was fortunate enough to get selected. I will be developing for Cantor project. Apart from coding, in my spare time I go for Cricket or Volleyball to keep myself refreshed.

  • Integrated Documentation in Cantor

    Cantor is an application that lets user use their favourite mathematicalapplications from within a nicely KDE-integrated worksheet interface. It offers assistant dialogs for common tasks and allows users to share their worksheets withothers. Cantor is one of many KDE educational projects. It supports a variety of backends, be it Maxima, Octave, Python, R and many more and that too packed in a single intuitive GUI. The current version of Cantor does not have support for viewing backend's documentation inside the application itself. For example, to view Maxima’s documentation or help, the application provides an external link pointing to the Maxima’s official documentation page which is opened in a fresh browser window. This has the obvious drawback of requiring an active internet connectivity.

The Linux Kernel Deprecates The 80 Character Line Coding Style

The Linux kernel has officially deprecated its coding style that the length of lines of code comply with 80 columns as the "strong preferred limit". The Linux kernel like many long-standing open-source projects has a coding style guideline that lines of code be 80 columns or less, but now that while still recommended is no longer going to be as enforced. This stems from Linus Torvalds commenting on Friday that excessive linebreaks are bad and is against ugly wrapped code that is strictly sticking to 80 characters per line. This is part of the broader trend that most are no longer using 80x25 terminals but with today's high resolution displays the terminal sizes are often larger though some preferring the default in order to allow more terminals to be displayed simultaneously on their nice displays. Read more Original from Torvalds:

  • clean up kernel_{read,write} & friends v2
    Not necessarily.
    
    Excessive line breaks are BAD. They cause real and every-day problems.
    
    They cause problems for things like "grep" both in the patterns and in
    the output, since grep (and a lot of other very basic unix utilities)
    is fundamentally line-based.
    
    So the fact is, many of us have long long since skipped the whole
    "80-column terminal" model, for the same reason that we have many more
    lines than 25 lines visible at a time.
    
    And honestly, I don't want to see patches that make the kernel reading
    experience worse for me and likely for the vast majority of people,
    based on the argument that some odd people have small terminal
    windows.
    
    If you or Christoph have 80 character lines, you'll get possibly ugly
    wrapped output. Tough. That's _your_ choice. Your hardware limitations
    shouldn't be a pain for the rest of us.
    
    Longer lines are fundamentally useful. My monitor is not only a lot
    wider than it is tall, my fonts are universally narrower than they are
    tall. Long lines are natural.
    
    When I tile my terminal windows on my display, I can have 6 terminals
    visible at one time, and that's because I have them three wide. And I
    could still fit 80% of a fourth one side-by-side.
    
    And guess what? That's with my default "100x50" terminal window (go to
    your gnome terminal settings, you'll find that the 80x25 thing is just
    an initial default that you can change), not with some 80x25 one. And
    that's with a font that has anti-aliasing and isn't some pixelated
    mess.
    
    And most of my terminals actually end up being dragged wider and
    taller than that. I checked, and my main one is 142x76 characters
    right now, because it turns out that wider (and taller) terminals are
    useful not just for source code.
    
    Have you looked at "ps ax" output lately? Or used "top"? Or done "git
    diff --stat" or any number of things where it turns out that 80x25 is
    really really limiting, and is simply NO LONGER RELEVANT to most of
    us.
    
    So no. I do not care about somebody with a 80x25 terminal window
    getting line wrapping.
    
    For exactly the same reason I find it completely irrelevant if
    somebody says that their kernel compile takes 10 hours because they
    are doing kernel development on a Raspberry PI with 4GB of RAM.
    
    People with restrictive hardware shouldn't make it more inconvenient
    for people who have better resources. Yes, we'll accommodate things to
    within reasonable limits. But no, 80-column terminals in 2020 isn't
    "reasonable" any more as far as I'm concerned. People commonly used
    132-column terminals even back in the 80's, for chrissake, don't try
    to make 80 columns some immovable standard.
    
    If you choose to use a 80-column terminal, you can live with the line
    wrapping. It's just that simple.
    
    And longer lines are simply useful. Part of that is that we aren't
    programming in the 80's any more, and our source code is fundamentally
    wider as a result.
    
    Yes, local iteration variables are still called 'i', because more
    context just isn't helpful for some anonymous counter. Being concise
    is still a good thing, and overly verbose names are not inherently
    better.
    
    But still - it's entirely reasonable to have variable names that are
    10-15 characters and it makes the code more legible. Writing things
    out instead of using abbreviations etc.
    
    And yes, we do use wide tabs, because that makes indentation something
    you can visually see in the structure at a glance and on a
    whole-function basis, rather than something you have to try to
    visually "line up" things for or count spaces.
    
    So we have lots of fairly fundamental issues that fairly easily make
    for longer lines in many circumstances.
    
    And yes, we do line breaks at some point. But there really isn't any
    reason to make that point be 80 columns any more.
    
                      Linus