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IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Open source marketing: Hacking our technology and process problems

    The teams that make up the Red Hat Open Studio are stewards of the Red Hat brand and identity. We are also makers, because Red Hat is an open source company, and open source is all about creating things.

    Open source is also about hacking together solutions when there isn’t an easy way to solve a problem.

  • Enterprise Kubernetes with OpenShift (Part one)

    The question “What’s the difference between Kubernetes and OpenShift?” comes up every now and then, and it is quite like asking: “What’s the difference between an engine and a car?”

    To answer the latter, a car is a product that immediately makes you productive: it is ready to get you where you want to go. The engine, in return, won’t get you anywhere unless you assemble it with other essential components that will form in the end a … car.

    As for the first question, in essence, you can think of it as Kubernetes being the engine that drives OpenShift, and OpenShift as the complete car (hence platform) that will get you where you want to.

  • Rules for product managers at open source companies

    Product management is an interesting career. It's immensely rewarding to be the interface between users, business strategy, engineering, and product design. And it's also a highly lucrative career with increasing demand for ambitious and empathetic practitioners.

    It's also a role with no single path. You might see various certifications and courses emerging to help address the serious skills shortage. The good news is that these are starting to contribute to the talent pipeline, but they struggle to address the wider demands of the role. This is especially the case where roles require direct experience across the enormous range of what it takes to build and ship successful products.

  • Red Hat simplifies container development and redistribution of RHEL packages

    Now, application developers in the Red Hat Technology Partner program can build their container apps and redeploy from the full set of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) user space packages (non-kernel). This nearly triples the number of packages over UBI only.

    When we introduced Red Hat Universal Base Images (UBI) in May 2019, we provided Red Hat partners the ability to freely use and redistribute a substantial number of RHEL packages that can be deployed on both Red Hat and non-Red Hat platforms. This gave developers the ability to build safe, secure, and portable container-based software that could then be deployed anywhere. The feedback on this has been overwhelmingly positive and we thank you for it, but we learned that you needed more, so we’re sharing this advanced preview with Red Hat Partner Connect members to help you with your planning.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Fluff and News

  • Q&A: How open source made Kubernetes appealing to enterprise app developers

    A: We are at an interesting inflection point right now with computing. We went from physical hardware to virtual machines to containers and to concepts like serverless computing. And we’re asking questions like, “Can it get even smaller?” We’re trying to make the underlying platform more powerful, but less and less visible. So if it’s invisible to developers, do we just stop caring about it? But you could make the same argument with Linux, right? If the application is done well, and Linux is doing its job, you shouldn't care about it. It's just running, it’s fast, it’s scalable. Kubernetes probably follows that path more than anything.

  • How open source communities work and what enterprises can learn
  • Inside Red Hat: Its open source heritage means big opportunity in cloud computing

    The open source proposition has been embedded in Red Hat’s roots since the company’s founding in 1993 and has since remained at the core of its guiding principles, with Linux operating system (OS) at the heart of all its innovations. Vendor loyalty and clearly charted paths were the mantras many companies operated on for years, while “digital transformation” was barely on an enterprise’s short-term road map. Then a decade ago, cloud adoption surged, creating the impetus to embrace more agile and flexible development models, and open source technologies emerged. [...] While the topic of COVID-19 did not overtly dominate the discussions or significantly color the overarching Red Hat messaging, it became clear that the ability to pivot rapidly, embrace change and remain flexible will underscore Red Hat’s efforts to successfully promote transformation amid the pandemic. Red Hat’s reputation has historically been predicated on its open and agile approach to development and deployment, long before such attributes were considered valuable, let alone essential.

  • Red Hat: Holding Its Own and Fueling Open Source Innovation

    When IBM acquired Red Hat for $34 billion in 2019, it was considered the industry’s largest software acquisition. The synergy between the two companies led them to become one of the leading hybrid multi-cloud providers globally. In most acquisitions, the acquired entity sometimes loses momentum and sheds some of its original luster. This does not seem to be the case with Red Hat.

Audio and Video: GNU World Order, Test and Code, More

  • GNU World Order 356

    Learn a little Postscript in this episode about **Ghostscript**.

  • Test and Code: 115: Catching up with Nina Zakharenko

    One of the great things about attending in person coding conferences, such as PyCon, is the hallway track, where you can catch up with people you haven't seen for possibly a year, or maybe even the first time you've met in person. Nina is starting something like the hallway track, online, on twitch, and it's already going, so check out the first episode of Python Tea. Interesting coincidence is that this episode is kind of like a hallway track discussion between Nina and Brian.

  • How to install Google Chrome on Pop!_OS 20.04
  • Are Custom Linux Kernels Faster than Stock?

    Are Custom Linux Kernels Faster than Stock? Benchmarks are done and will be compared using phoronix test suite. We will be analyzing 3 kernels, Liquorix, Mainline, and Xanmod.

Linux Lite 5.0 Final Released

Linux Lite 5.0 Final Codename Emerald is now available for download and installation. This is the most feature rich, complete Linux Lite release to date. This is the release many people have been waiting for. See below for details. Read more Also new: Whonix VirtualBox 15.0.1.3.4 - Point Release!

Open Data and GIS

  • How Open-Source Data Can Drive Automotive Innovation
  • LiDAR-Captured Road Data Now Publicly Available in Open-Source Machine Learning Dataset

    Scale AI says COVID-19 has shown the value of autonomous vehicles for no-contact delivery. They're making real-world road data available to train machine learning models to this end. Last week, Scale AI released PandaSet to the open-source community. According to Scale AI, PandaSet is the world’s first publicly-available machine learning dataset to include images from forward-facing solid-state LiDARs and mechanical spinning LiDARs. These two LiDAR technologies from Hesai will allow ML development teams to reap complex, real-world road data.

  • Podcast: Why should you take a closer look into Open Source GIS?
  • This German town replicated itself in VR to keep its tourism alive

    Nicolai Reith, Head of the Control and Communication department and advisor to the Mayor of Herrenberg, told Cities Today: “You don’t have to make a decision and then see [what happens]; you can see before you make the decision what the effect will be via the digital twin. This makes it easier to make the right decision for our city council, politicians, and citizens.”Herrenberg is already using the digital twin, which incorporates super-computing and technologies typically deployed in advanced aerospace, to visualize city data and citizens’ emotional responses to inform better decision-making. There are now plans to develop the emerging area of virtual tourism for the town, which has a population of around 31,000. “We have a very beautiful city center so tourists can explore it in a digital way with VR glasses before they come to Herrenberg, which is an interesting benefit for the future,” Reith said. [...] The team then added in geographic information system (GIS) data and traffic control systems data to incorporate topography, road geometry , and detailed traffic flows. Using the open-source fluid dynamics code OpenFOAM — which is typically used for modeling fuel injector sprays or airplane aerodynamics —they also created realistic models of the movement of wind and emissions through the city.