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Distributions Were For Linux, Not For Kubernetes

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Linux

I often liken the Kubernetes revolution and the way it's taking over the cloud to Linux/Unix and the way it took over servers. I think we're right at the beginning of the same kind of revolution, and I'm not the only one who is seeing this trend, as evidenced by so many companies cropping up to capitalize on its growth.

Companies looking to make money in the world of Linux went out and took the core, bundled it up with their best practices and their favorite applications, and then sold it as a "distribution." You see this with Red Hat Linux, Ubuntu, etc. — even the open-source versions took the base system and then built significantly above and beyond that to the point where each had its own default windowing interface, and some were massively different experiences for the user even though what was underneath was basically the same.

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