Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Hands-On Lab: Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services

    Many Linux environments require data to be encrypted at rest but that can add administrative overhead to the boot process. Oracle Linux has supported disk encryption since version 5 but a feature was added in 7 update 4 to allow the automatic unlocking of devices based on external network services. Network Bound Disk Encryption (NBDE) uses a network based key service to validate a system is on a trusted network and unlock encrypted disks upon boot. By combining NBDE and a keyboard entered passphrase the system will unlock a disk automatically during boot but allow administrators to use a passphrase during maintenance operations.

    A new hands-on lab Oracle Linux Disk Encryption Using Network Based Key Services is now available for anyone to learn the concepts of Linux disk encryption. The lab begins with the creation of a encrypted block device dependent on a passphrase and continues to an example of network based keys to unlock the device. Oracle Linux 8 is used but the same tools are available on Oracle Linux 7. The base components involved include dm-crypt which allows arbitrary block devices to be encrypted, Linux Unified Key Setup (LUKS) a disk encryption standard and cryptsetup which is used to configure our disks. We continue to include Tang, a network service that provides cryptographic services over HTTP and Clevis, an encryption framework. Clevis can use keys provided by Tang as a passphrase to unlock LUKS volumes.

  • Mir 1.7.1 Released With X11 Support Promoted Out Of "Experimental" Phase

    Most significant with Mir 1.7.1 is the X11 support being improved to the point that it's no longer considered experimental for running traditional X11 software atop Wayland. Passing --enable-x11 now can be used for enabling the X11 support rather than the prior "x11-display-experimental" option. Mir 1.7.1 saw a lot of work to the XWayland and X11 window manage code, including a new display FD option.

  • SUSE Manager 4 Brings the Power of DevOps to Your Enterprise Linux Environment

    DevOps is an IT management philosophy that requires speed, efficiency and confidence. A DevOps environment is constantly evolving: Containers spin up, new applications appear, tools are tested and updates happen—all without stoppages or significant downtime.

  • Liquid Prep, a solution that helps farmers optimize water usage during droughts, is now open source

    When a prolonged absence of water in a region leads to drought conditions, the entire ecosystem suffers. Among those hardest hit are farmers, and the impact on their land can have ripple effects on the larger population. These larger problems can range from health issues or food security, while also creating conditions that increase the risk of wildfires and dust storms.

    Created by five technologists from the IBM offices in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Liquid Prep is a solution designed for low-literate farmers in developing countries whose success hinges on access to advanced agricultural advice. By leveraging the use of an intuitive mobile Android app, local soil sensors, and weather forecast information as well as an advanced agricultural decision platform hosted on IBM Cloud, farmers are better informed on how to use limited water supplies and increase their chances of growing healthy crops for their small plots of land.

  • Linux-ready SBCs and mini-PCs run Ryzen Embedded, including new 8-10W R1305G

    Sapphire unveiled NP-FP5 and BP-FP5 SBCs with Ryzen V1000 and R1000 SoCs plus a G-series board, and Simply NUC revealed Red Oak (NP-FP5) and Post Oak (BP-FP5) mini-PCs based on the Ryzen SBCs. The NP-FP5 and Red Oak support AMD’s new 8-10W R1305G.

    At Embedded World, Sapphire Technology announced a pair of 4 x 4-inch (101.6 x 101.6mm) SBCs that run Linux or Win 10 on AMD’s x86-based Ryzen Embedded V1000 and R1000 SoCs. The dual 4K display NP-FP5 and more feature-rich, triple 4K display BP-FP5 SBCs support the same V1000 and R1000 models. The lower-end NP-FP5 also supports the low-power, 8-10W TDP R1305G, which was announced today by AMD along with a 6W R1102G.

  • Mirantis co-founder launches FreedomFi to bring private LTE networks to enterprises

    Boris Renski, the co-founder of Mirantis, one of the earliest and best-funded players in the OpenStack space a few years ago (which then mostly pivoted to Kubernetes and DevOps), has left his role as CMO to focus his efforts on a new startup: FreedomFi. The new company brings together open-source hardware and software to give enterprises a new way to leverage the newly opened 3.5 GHz band for private LTE and — later — 5G IoT deployments.

  • WordPress 5.4 Beta 3

    WordPress 5.4 Beta 3 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

    [...]

    WordPress 5.4 is slated for release on March 31st, 2020, and we need your help to get there.

    Thanks to the testing and feedback from everyone who tested beta 2 (and beta 1) over 24 tickets have been closed in the past week.

  • Luis Villa: Surviving 2020 on Twitter

    At some point in the past few years, I accepted that I’m going to have a baseline level of anger about the state of the world, and that I have to focus on what I can change and let go of what I can’t. (Twitter anger is the latter.) So what can I change? Where is my anger productive?

    I’ve found that doing things offline—for me, mostly giving money—really helps. In particular, giving to causes that seek systemic (usually, that means political/government) change like 350.org and local activist groups, and giving a lot, and regularly. This, frankly, makes it a lot easier for me to ignore anger online — each new tweet is not likely to make me be more angry, or give more, because I’m already basically giving what I can. Being confident about that really reduced my FOMO when I started filtering aggressively.

    I hear from non-parents/non-startup-founders that physical-world activism (door-knocking, phone banking, local gov meeting-attending, etc.) can be great in this way too but sadly I can’t confirm Sad

    (I also want to acknowledge that, in the current state of the world, ‘letting go’ gets harder the less privilege you have. I have no great response to that, except to say that I empathize and am trying to fight for you where and how I can.)

  • Why Source Code Scanning Tools are Essential to Open Source Compliance [Ed: This promotes proprietary software of Microsoft 'proxies', along with FUD, to make proprietary software sales]

    There are many scanning tools and vendors to choose from. For example, Black Duck, WhiteSource, and FOSSA are well-known vendors that offer scanning tools on a subscription basis. FOSSology is an open source scanning tool maintained by the Linux Foundation, but it doesn’t come with a pre-populated library of open source code or software repository, which you would need to build on your own.

  • Google and Microsoft are scaring consumers over Edge extensions, and for what?

    Simply trying to install a Chrome extension via the Chrome Web Store actually requires navigating through several warnings, from both Google and Microsoft, about where to go to install an extension. The confusion and frustration this no doubt creates with users reflects poorly on both sides.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Perl, Rust and More

  • The [Perl] Weekly Challenge #062

    Once again, Neil Bowers, came up with another exciting task for all Team PWC members. Like always, it was fun task. Thanks to Ryan for providng sample data and expected result based on the definition of the task. Half the job done already. The only thing left for the us, is get on with the job. I noticed Raku needed slightly different approach then the Perl. It could be I am doing something very badly. I am happy to correct myself, if you find anything silly. More on this, later down below. However the second task of the week, N Queens, turned out to tough nut to crack for me. For the first, since I started contributing, I gave up on this. Technically speaking, I did attempt to solve it with the help of my 11 year old daughter, but it was only limited to 2D rather than 3D as expected in the task. Therefore I decided not to submit my solution. Having said that I didn’t want to loose my work, so just for record, I am sharing in this blog, just in case, if I want to re-visit the code.

  • New Arel like SQL Manager

    Some months ago I started working in a system similar to ActiveRecord. But then it became pretty big so then I centered my attention in a SQL AST manager instead. So I made a library that is basically an Arel port. You can see the README with most of the basic info. After looking at implementations in CPAN I realized there are many of them already but all of them based on hash structures.

  • In Rust, we lust: Security-focused super-C++ language still most loved among Stack Overflow denizens

    Rust for the fifth year in a row has held its position as the most-loved programming language in Stack Overflow's annual developer survey, even if it's not the primary language for most programmers and not many jobs require it. Rust, beloved by 86 per cent of respondents this year, recently celebrated five years since its 1.0 release. After years of appreciation for its memory safety features, speed, and other benefits, the language is making the move from an aspirational technology to a growing presence in savvy software organizations.

  • Performant Containerized Go* Applications with Intel® Advanced Vector Extensions 512 on Clear Linux* OS

    Major cloud software such as Docker*, etcd*, Istio*, Kubernetes*, Prometheus*, and Terraform* use the Go* programming language for core cloud infrastructure components. Why are they using Go? Compared with many other scripting languages, Go is fast! This article shows how to develop performant Go applications that leverage Intel® Advanced Vector Extensions 512 (Intel® AVX-512) and a Go container based on Clear Linux* OS to improve the performance potential of Go. [...] Go is an open source programming language with concurrency mechanisms that help developers make full use of multicore and networked machines. It is expressive, modular, and efficient. Go based data science and analytic applications typically leverage gonum, a set of libraries for matrices, statistics, and optimization. Libraries like gonum build on top of a lower-level BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines) layer. Gonum / netlib creates wrapper packages that provide an interface to Netlib CBLAS implementations. Because netlib uses C and CBLAS, using gonum/netlib provides indirect use of an Intel processor’s Intel AVX-512 capability, if available on the running system. The gonum/netlib recommended BLAS layer for performance on Linux is OpenBLAS. OpenBLAS is an optimized open source BLAS library based on GotoBLAS2 1.13 BSD version, implemented in C. It provides a BLAS layer implementation with Intel AVX-512 acceleration that is adaptable to Intel® Advanced Vector Extensions 2 (Intel® AVX2) or Intel® Streaming SIMD Extensions (Intel® SSE) only platforms.

  • Intel's Clear Linux Working On AVX-512 Optimized Golang Container

    One of the latest performance optimizations being pursued by Intel on the open-source Linux side is providing an AVX-512-optimized container for Golang usage. Intel's Clear Linux crew has assembled a new container providing AVX-512 tuned Go language support paired with AVX-512 optimized Glibc, OpenMP, and OpenBLAS libraries for operating on Intel's Xeon Scalable servers.

  • Some notes on Corona

    In many ways, very little has changed in the way I work on Free Software projects. I get paid to do so – partly on Calamares, partly on other things – and there simply was no switch-to-remote work for me. Sitting at my desk, two monitors, FreeBSD underneath and Linux VMs in my face, with IRC for realtime communication: that’s been part-and-parcel of work for years now and nothing has changed there. Except that now there’s people in the house. One thing I notice is that when kid[1] is at the machine next to mine, it’s distracting. But how distracting, depends on what is on-screen. Java code only a little, until I feel the urge to ask what’s the issue – then I’m the cardboard cutout dog. Geometry Dash also only a little, since the rhythmic clicking of the mechanical keyboard mostly makes the same sound as my own keyboard when I’m doing something derpy like re-indenting chunks of CMakeLists.txt. Minecraft, on the other hand, drives me nuts. I just can’t work sitting next to that. The Slimbook sees a lot more work now, when I flee to the living room. But that’s where online lessons are happening, so I need to sneak around (sometimes out around the side of the house to cross to the other end of the room) because I don’t want to be broadcast accidentally to 20 students listening to middle-school explanations of quadratic equations. The equations are written on the blackboard painted onto one wall of the room. kid[0] had final exams cancelled out from under them, so they graduated from school with very little sound or fury. We wrote out a CV together and they now have a job (in “smart” lockdown times!) until the end of the summer and the start of university.

  • This'll make you feel old: Uni compsci favourite Pascal hits the big five-oh this year

    Pascal, a descendant of ALGOL 60 and darling of computer science courses for decades, turns 50 this year. For engineers of a certain age, Pascal was hard to avoid in the latter part of the last century. Named for 17th-century French mathematician Blaise Pascal, the language is attributed to Swiss computer scientist Niklaus Wirth and was created in part due to Wirth's frustration with the process to improve the ALGOL 60 language. Involved in the ALGOL X effort, Wirth proposed ALGOL W, which, while not deemed a sufficient advance over ALGOL 60, became Pascal in 1970.

Python Programming

  • How to handle bulk data insertion SQLite + python

    When it comes of handling huge amount of data, the most common things that developer always does is to store data in a single manner each SQL statement has a new transaction started for it. This is very expensive, since it requires reopening, writing to, and closing the journal file for each statement. Despite that fact that they can do it in a bulk transaction. Now how do we did this? I’ll show you. Let’s say you have 20,000 candidate records to be inserted in your database. It really makes sense to consider a bulk transaction right? Sure why not.

  • Convert Bytearray to Bytes in Python

    Many different types of data objects are supported by Python. Two of them are the objects bytearray and bytes. The bytearray() function returns an array object of bytes. This object is changeable and supports the integer number from 0 to 255. The bytes() function returns bytes objects, is not changeable, and supports the integers from 0 to 255. This article will describe these functions and explain how bytearray objects can be converted into bytes objects.

  • List Intersection in Python

    Many object variables exist in python to store a variety of data types. The list is one of these variables and can store different types of data for different needs. Sometimes, we need to find common, uncommon, or both common and uncommon data items from the multiple lists for programming purposes. Python contains several built-in functions and operators that can perform these types of tasks for Python sets. Finding common data from the multiple lists is called list intersection, but there is no operator or built-in function for lists like sets to find the common data items from multiple lists. This tutorial will show you how to intersect lists in Python.

  • How to Execute Shell Commands in Python Using the Subprocess Run Method

    Subprocess is a built-in Python module that can be used to create new processes and interact with their input and output data streams. In simpler terms, you can use it to run shell commands and run executable binaries usually scattered in various “bin” folders across a Linux file system. You can also supply a full path to an executable binary and use any command-line switches associated with the binary. This article will explain how to use the subprocess module and its run method in Python apps. All code samples in the article are tested with Python 3.8.2 on Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Use the Python Isalpha Function

    Sometimes, we need to check the content of data for programming purposes. There are many different types of built-in functions in Python for string data to check the content This content may include letters, numbers, or other special characters. The isalpha() function is one of the useful built-in functions of Python that can be used to find out whether or not the content of the data is alphabetic. This function searches the alphabet in the starting of the string value. If the starting value of the string is a letter, then this function returns true; otherwise, it returns false. This tutorial will show you how to can use the isalpha() function in Python.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Blog #1

    Hello Everyone, this is Soham Biswas currently in 2nd year pursuing my Bachelor’s(B.Tech) degree in Computer Science & Engineering from Institute of Engineering & Management, Kolkata. I have been selected for GSoC' 20 at sub-org FURY under the umbrella organisation of Python Software Foundation. I will be working on building sci-fi-like 2D and 3D interfaces and provide physics engine integration under project titled "Create new UI widgets & Physics Engine Integration".

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: First Blog GSoC 2020
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #1
  • PSF GSoC students blogs: GSoC Blog : Week 1

    Since most of the places including my university are closed due to the pandemic outbreak, I decided to get a head start and start with the project early. During the community bonding period, I had video conference meetings with my mentors scheduled every week on Wednesday. During these meetings i interacted with the mentors to have a coherent understanding of how the project design and implementation will be managed over the course of the entire period. Since my project involves a lot of theoretical understanding of concepts such as ray marching, I spent the period going through the theory of each topic.This week also involved going through the documentation for shaders used in VTK.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Community Bonding Check-in

    I had an onboarding meeting with my mentors where we got to know each other a bit better. They advised me to play around with uarray and unumpy without any goal in mind which I found to be a very good advice. I played a bit with special methods by implementing a simple Vector2D class and used the code in this notebook with some print statements to understand better the protocols and how they are called. I wanted to start earlier on my project so I took over a PR from one of my mentors which adds multimethods for the linalg module. What is coming up next? I'm going to continue the PR that I have been working on since it still isn't finished and I will also follow the proposed timeline and start adding multimethods for other routines like checking class equality in array elements. Some mathematical constants and their aliases are also missing so I will be adding these too and probably refactoring the existing ones into classes. This week marks the end of my college classes but I still have some assignments and exams coming up in the following weeks so there's a lot of work ahead of me to proper balance both university studies and GSoC but I wouldn't have it other way.

  • Weekly Python StackOverflow Report: (ccxxx) stackoverflow python report

The Ongoing CPU Security Mitigation Impact On The Core i9 10900K Comet Lake

At least for the workloads tested this round, when booting the new Intel Core i9 10900K "Comet Lake" processor with the software-controlled CPU security mitigations disabled, the overall performance was elevated by about 6% depending upon the workload. Here is a look at the out-of-the-box security mitigations for this new Intel desktop CPU against foregoing the default CPU security mitigations and running an unprotected configuration to see what the pre-Spectre performance looks like. Read more

today's howtos