Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PCLinuxOS Preview-9

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
-s

PCLinuxOS is a binary-based Linux distribution that got its start during the summer of 2003 and was based at that time upon Mandrake 9.2 (now known as Mandriva). It's presented as a livecd, but one of its main features is its wonderful graphic harddrive installer that offers the user a beautiful fully functional complete desktop operating system. To call it a livecd is an injustice. However, Texstar, the main developer calls it just that on his site. To quote the legend, "PCLinuxOS Preview 9 is an English only self-booting live cd that runs entirely from a bootable CD without installing anything on your computer. Data on the CD is uncompressed on the fly allowing up to 2 GB of programs on one CD."

Preview 3 made it's short lived appearance in the early Fall of 2003 and was originally built upon Mandrake 9.2. Preview 4 was released in October 2003 and was mainly bug fixes and a few updates to Pre-3. However subsequent releases have been built upon the prior. At that time Mandrake was still using a 2.4 kernel, devfs, and XFree86. Texstar et al have since built an entirely new os upon its own structure and its own merit. It has evolved into its own right much the way Mandriva has evolved way beyond its Redhat beginnings. Texstar has developed PCLOS into a modern os utilizing a 2.6.11 kernel, xorg 6.8.2, and udev with hal and KDE 3.4.1. Again, it'd be better to quote the man himself from a post right here on tuxmachines, "PCLinuxOS Preview 4 was initally based on Linux Mandrake 9.2. PCLinuxOS Preview 5,6,7,8 and 9 have been built against the prior PCLinuxOS release. Thank you Mandriva for giving us a good base to work upon.

Preview 9 features Kernel 2.6.11-oci11 which has been patched and tested to work well with KDE 3.4.1. KDE 3.4.1 utilizes the Hal/dbus backend for autmounting removable media such as usbkeys, cdroms, cameras, scanners and other perpherials. We have tried to provide you with a complete out of box working experience."

Another advantage to livecds is their innate ability to allow the user to test a distribution before actually installing to their harddrive. I believe most modern Linux binary distributions will eventually go this way - or should. This method has so many advantages in addition to try-before-you-commit, such as having a fully functional computer while the install takes place. No more are the bored minutes watching a progress bar with anticipation. Read your email, surf the web, or play a game while the harddrive installer does its thing.

The harddrive install is a thing of beauty. Not only does it function well, but it does it in style. A gorgeous graphical interface walks the user through the install hiding the tendious innerworkings without limiting the users choices. It's so easy, click click click and you're in your nice new operating system ready to add any desired software and carry on with your work or play.

This is exactly what I did. When I booted up my new os, the first thing I did was fire up synaptic and effortlessly installed the kernel sources. Two or three clicks I believe was all it took.

I exited my session of kde and chose "console login" and was taken to the terminal. Here I mounted my archive partition and ran the nvidia graphic driver installer. Then I edited the xorg.conf with nano, changing nv to nvidia under the device section, and issued the command "startx". No fuss no muss. Can't ask for anything more! But that the key to PCLOS. With perhaps only a few exceptions, none I experienced personally, it just works. In less than 5 minutes from booting my fresh PCLOS install, I was enjoying gl screensavers and 3D games.

New versions in this release include:

  • kernel-pclos-i586-up-1GB-2.6.11.oci11.mdk-1-1oci

  • kdebase-3.4.1-4tex
  • xorg-x11-6.8.2-3tex
  • udev-057-1tex
  • gaim-1.3.0-2tex
  • fluxbox-0.9.12-1tex
  • Full List

Updates and newer versions of applications are continuously being offered. Seems almost as though Texstar works around the clock 24/7 to update, fix bugs, and fill requests. His synaptic (and apt-get) installable rpms are offered on mirrors all over the world and Preview 9 comes with some mirrors already configured. I needed only to say yes to the pop up suggesting I update the list. To help support development, Texstar et al also have a Premium server for those individuals who make donations. As explained by Texstar,

"To reward those who send development funds via paypal, we have established a premium access software server for PCLinuxOS. This repository provides unlimited bandwidth and storage. It is not a free server and is only available at this time to those who donate funds towards the development of PCLinuxOS. All new software packages appear on this server first then at a later date, the public server gets the packages."

If you would like to make a donation and receive your PASS to the premium server, please consult this page for details.

In conclusion, this release, much like its predecessors, was the most gorgeous operating system I'd ever seen. But beyond that it was still the most stable, fully functioning and complete OS I'd had the pleasure of testing. I found it fast in operation, a feast for the eyes, and unsurpassed in ease of use. It just gets better and better each release.

Besides the sneak peek shots showing the absolute beauty of PCLOS, I have posted some of the final depicting some of the functionality that can be yours. Please see my Sneak Peek for more details on some of the new features included as well.

Bittorrent available here. It was coming in as fast as my dsl could handle earlier today.

More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Leap 42.2 Now Merged with SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 2

The development cycle of the openSUSE Leap 42.2 operating system continues, and today we would like to inform our readers about the availability of the third and last Alpha build in the series. Read more

Linux 4.7 and Linux 4.8

  • Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released, Introduces Support for Radeon RX480 GPUs
    Today, July 24, 2016, after a week of holiday fun, Linus Torvalds has had the great pleasure of announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7 for all GNU/Linux operating systems. The Linux 4.7 kernel has been in development for the past two months, but that shouldn't surprise anyone who is either reading our website on a regular basis or keeping pace with the Linux kernel development cycle, which was very normal for this branch. A total of seven Release Candidate (RC) testing builds were released since May 29, 2016, which introduced numerous new features and improvements.
  • The Biggest Features Of The Linux 4.7 Kernel
    If all goes according to plan, the Linux 4.7 kernel will be released before the day is through.
  • The Size Of Different DRM Graphics Drivers In Linux 4.7
    Last October I looked at The Size Of The Different Open-Source Linux DRM/Mesa Graphics Drivers, but with it being nearly one year since then and Linux 4.7 due out today, I decided to run some fresh L.O.C. measurements on the popular DRM/KMS drivers to see their current sizes. This lines-of-code counting was mostly done out of a curiosity factor. In this article I'm just looking at the in-kernel DRM code and not the Mesa drivers, DDX drivers, LLVM back-ends, or anything else in user-space related to the open-source graphics drivers.
  • The Btrfs Windows Driver Updated With RAID Support & Other Features
  • Hardened Usercopy Appears Ready To Be Merged For Linux 4.8
    Yet another Linux kernel security feature coming to the mainline kernel that appears readied for the Linux 4.8 merge window is hardened usercopy. Hardened usercopy was originally based upon GrSecurity's PAX_USERCOPY feature but reworked into a whole new form, according to developer Kees Cook at Google. This hardened usercopy is to be exposed as the CONFIG_HARDENED_USERCOPY option within the kernel.

Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS Fixes the Raspberry Pi Partition Resizer, Adds MATE 1.14

As part of the Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) announcement, Martin Wimpress informs us about the release of the Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS operating systems for users of Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS. Ubuntu MATE 16.04.1 LTS is not a major release, and if your Ubuntu MATE 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) installation is up to date, you already have the latest software updates and security patches that have been injected in the new installation mediums generated mainly for those who want to reinstall or deploy the OS on new systems. Read more

elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" Gets New Beta with over 70 Bugfixes, RC1 Coming Next

The guys over elementary OS have released a second Beta version of the highly anticipated elementary OS 0.4 "Loki" operating system, fixing numerous of the issues reported by users since the first Beta. This time, the announcement was made by Daniel 'DanRabbit' Foré, who reports that more than 70 bugs reported by public beta testers since last month's Beta release have been squashed, and that many of the fixes are in fact configuration changes, which means that they won't be available to those running the first Beta build, so they'll have to make a fresh install. Read more