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Programming: OpenXR, Fuchsia OS, Prolog and State of 'DevOps'

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Development
  • Open source XR runtime (VR/AR) 'Monado' sees a first release

    With the Khronos Group launching the OpenXR specification last year, their aim was to unify Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) development while Collabora worked on their open source implementation of Monado.

    Collabora have been hard at work on Monado, a currently Linux-focused open source XR runtime that will eventually also support other platforms. Today, they tagged the very first release. With this release they've worked in new drivers, there's now a set of scripts ready for people to try Monado rather than needing to setup a full development environment, udev rules sorted for USB permissions for XR hardware, distribution packaging and more.

    You can see the release announcement on the Collabora blog, where they note they also have some internships going. As for the code, it's all up on GitLab if you're interested in checking out in this early form. The future of XR on Linux sounds quite exciting, especially with efforts like this and Collabora do some great open source work.

  • Monado OpenXR runtime developer update

    We are very happy to tag version 0.1 of the Monado OpenXR runtime for Linux!

    Ever since announcing the project at GDC 2019, we have been working on improving the full open source XR stack to a usable state. Do keep in mind, this is a first tag, not a final release so it will contain some tinkering and is not feature complete! To echo the common phrase 'Be warned, here be dragons!'.

    Feel free to play around with Monado, and hit us up on our Discord to get help, report bugs or ask about contributing!

  • Google programming language scorecard: How C, C++, Dart, Rust, Go rate for Fuchsia

    Google has released a new programming language policy for Fuchsia, its under-development OS that some speculate could be its non-Linux successor to Android.

    Instead of a Linux kernel, the core of Google's Fuchsia OS is a Zircon microkernel to communicate with hardware and boot a system that runs Fuchsia. Google describes Fuchsia as specifically "not Linux" and a "modular, capability-based operating system".

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Prolog

    Prolog is a general purpose, declarative, logic programming language, often associated with artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, intelligent database retrieval, and problem solving. It’s widely used in research and education for natural language processing.

    Automatic backtracking is one of the most characteristic features of Prolog. It’s a form of searching, fundamental to all artificial intelligence techniques. Prolog also supports multi-directional reasoning; arguments to a procedure can freely be designated inputs and outputs in different ways in different procedure calls. This is a powerful theorem-proving technique. Another key feature of Prolog is that its syntax and semantics are closer to formal logic than say Lisp.

    Prolog is generally regarded as a difficult language to get to grips with. But learning the fundamentals of Prolog is definitely worthwhile.

  • State of DevOps Report Finds Maturity Varies Widely by Industry

    The scorecard gave the technology industry an "A" for DevOps adoption and an "A-" for security integration as part of the DevOps development pipeline. Brown noted that it was expected that companies in the technology industry would be leading the pack in terms of security integration because DevOps tends to be part of the DNA of those organizations.

Monado OpenXR Runtime v0.1 Released

  • Monado OpenXR Runtime v0.1 Released For Open-Source XR Stack

    Announced last March was Monado as an open-source implementation of OpenXR, the Khronos standard for AR/VR. Today marks the first release of Monado as version 0.1 so while it's still early on it is showing much progress.

    This open-source XR stack has added support for the Project North Star as an open-source optical see-through headset, an Intel RealSense T265 driver is also available, scripts for trying various demos, and packaging support for various Linux distributions.

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