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Even better screencast with GNOME on Wayland

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GNOME

With last week’s release of PipeWire 3, and Mutter’s subsequent adaptation to depend on it, I decided to revive something I have started to work on a few months ago. The results can be found in this merge request.

PipeWire 0.3 brings one very interesting and important feature to the game: it can import DMA-Buf file descriptors, and share it with clients. On the client side, one easy way to make use of this feature is simply by using the pipewiresrc source in GStreamer.

The key aspect of DMA-Buf sharing is that we avoid copying images between GPU and CPU memory. On a 4K monitor, which is what I’m using these days, that means it avoids needlessly copying almost 2GB of pixels every second.

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GNOME On Wayland Screencasting Is About To Be A Heck Of...

  • GNOME On Wayland Screencasting Is About To Be A Heck Of A Lot More Efficient

    Pending GNOME Mutter changes in conjunction with the new PipeWire 0.3 will offer a big improvement in making use of GNOME's screencasting support from Wayland sessions.

    GNOME's screencasting / monitor sharing support under Wayland has already been in quite good shape compared to other desktops/compositors on Wayland, but with PipeWire 0.3 and pending Mutter changes is a big step forward. With PipeWire 0.3 is support for importing DMA-BUF file descriptors and sharing it with clients, which can avoid excess image copies between CPU and GPU memory. As we see time and time again, using DMA-BUF can provide big wins for performance thanks to properly designed zero-copy buffer sharing between drivers and hardware blocks.

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