Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Vulkan Survey and AMDVLK, AMD Targets GNU/Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • LunarG's Vulkan developer survey results out now - Vulkan also turns 4

    LunarG, the software company that Valve sponsors who work on building out the ecosystem for the Vulkan API recently conducted a Vulkan developer survey with the results out now.

    Before going over the results, just a reminder that Vulkan just recently turned four years old! The 1.0 specification went public on February 16, 2016. Since then, we've seen some pretty amazing things thanks to it. We've had Linux ports that perform really nicely, the mighty DXVK translation layer advanced dramatically, to the vkBasalt post-processing layer and so on—there's been a lot going on. However, as a graphics API do remember it's pretty young and has a long life ahead of it.

    As for the LunarG survey: there were 349 replies to it, and while not a huge amount it gives us an interesting insight into what some developers think and feel about how Vulkan is doing as a whole. Overall, it gives quite a positive picture on the health of Vulkan with over 60% feeling the overall quality of the Vulkan ecosystem as "Good" and almost 20% rating it as "Excellent".

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 Released With Vulkan 1.2 Support

    AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 is out as the first official AMD open-source Vulkan Linux driver code drop in one month.

    AMDVLK has been off its wagon this quarter with their previous weekly/bi-weekly code drops of AMDVLK but that just means the v2020.Q1.2 is quite a big one. First up, AMDVLK 2020.Q1.2 now is supporting Vulkan 1.2 that debuted back in January and with Mesa's RADV Radeon Vulkan driver already having supported it for weeks.

  • Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q1.1 for Linux Released

    AMD's Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 20.Q1.1 Linux driver release was made available this week as their newest quarterly driver installment intended for use with Radeon Pro graphics hardware.

More in Tux Machines

Reading about open source in French

English speakers have so many wonderful open source resources that it's easy to forget that communications in English aren't accessible to everyone everywhere. Therefore, I've been looking for great open source resources in Spanish and French, so I can recommend them when the need arises. One I've been looking at recently is LinuxFr.org, which seems to be a fine "agora" for all sorts of interesting conversations in French about open source specifically and open everything else as well. Read more

Open Source Password Manager Bitwarden Introduces Two New Useful Features: Trash Bin & Vault Timeout

Bitwarden is unquestionably one of the best password managers available for Linux. It’s also a cross-platform solution — so you can use it almost anywhere you like. You can also read our review of Bitwarden if you want to explore more about it. Now, coming back to the news. Recently, Bitwarden introduced two new major features that makes it even better. Read more

6 Kubernetes Security Best Practices Every Linux Administrator Should Know

Kubernetes is a popular container orchestration platform used by many professionals around the world. It’s an open-source platform that enables you to manage containerization, providing you with feature-rich controls. However, Kubernetes is not easy to learn and maintain. To properly secure Kubernetes operations, you need to adopt certain best practices. Read more

Linux at Home – Take a break with rapid gameplay

In this series, we look at a range of home activities where Linux can make the most of our time at home, keeping active and engaged. The change of lifestyle enforced by Covid-19 is an opportunity to expand our horizons, and spend more time on activities we have neglected in the past. We’ve seen welcome relief in the past few weeks in European countries, with marked declines in Covid-19 associated deaths. Sadly, the pandemic is rampant in many countries including Mexico, USA, Brazil, and India. Given that working from home is likely to remain popular, it’s essential we strike a balance. When working from home, it’s very easy to lose track of time. It’s important to take regular breaks. Playing video games offers one avenue. There are many benefits of playing video games. Examples include improved coordination, problem-solving skills, it improves attention and concentration, and much more. Read more