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GNOME 3.34.4 Released with Various Improvements and Bug Fixes

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GNOME
Security

Released on September 2019, the GNOME 3.34 “Thessaloniki” desktop environment is the first to adopt a new release cycle with extended maintenance updates. Previous GNOME releases only received two maintenance updates during their support cycle.

Therefore, GNOME 3.34.4 is here as a minor bugfix release to GNOME 3.34, addressing various issues, as well as updating translations across several components and applications. Among the changes, there’s a big GTK update with better Wayland support, VP8 encoding for the built-in screen-recorder, and another major Vala update.

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GNOME 3.34.4 Released With Many Bug Fixes

  • GNOME 3.34.4 Released With Many Bug Fixes

    While GNOME 3.36 will be released in just a few weeks, GNOME 3.34.4 is out today as the latest stable update in the current series.

    GNOME 3.34.4 comes with a large number of bug fixes, many of which were back-ported from the 3.35 development series leading up to the GNOME 3.36.0 release on 11 March. Some of the GNOME 3.34.4 fixes include...

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