Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Brave Browser and DRM With 'Open' Veneer

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Data Doctors: Is the Brave browser safe to use?

    If you’re like most users, you spend more time using a browser than any other program on your computer or smartphone.

    You probably don’t think about what browser you’re using; the focus is on getting to a website, not what got you there.

    Google Chrome is by far the most popular browser, but because it’s a Google product integrated with all their tracking and advertising networks, a lot of people are looking for an alternative.

  • Here’s how to know if the Brave browser is safe to use

    A: If you’re like most users, you spend more time using a browser than any other program on your computer or smartphone.

    You probably don’t think about what browser you’re using as the focus is on getting to a website and not what got you there.

    Google’s Chrome is by far the most popular browser, but because it’s a Google product integrated with all their tracking and advertising networks, a lot of people are looking for an alternative.

  • Netflix Now Exploring AVIF For Image Compression

    Following Netflix's AV1 adoption with collaborating with Intel on the SVT-AV1 encoder, now using AV1 streaming for Android users, and others around this advanced royalty-free video codec, Netflix is now exploring AVIF as their next-gen image format.

    [...]

    Netflix acknowledges the significant need for next-gen image coding that has better compression efficiency and more features than JPEG. Netflix believes AVIF has the potential albeit they aren't yet ready to transition to AVIF today.

    In their testing they are finding good results out of AVIF compared to JPEG and other image formats. For those wanting to go through a long and interesting technical read, on the Netflix Tech Blog they have example screenshots and results comparing their AVIF results to other formats.

  • Netflix begins streaming AV1 content on its Android mobile app

    Netflix today announced that it is beginning to stream videos compressed using the AV1 codec, on its Android mobile app. AV1 is a next-generation, royalty-free video codec that provides compression efficiency that is improved by 20%. This codec, developed to replace VP9, was built by the Alliance for Open Media, of which Netflix, Google, Amazon Prime Video, and more big-name content providers are a part of.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 20 Promises Improved Support for NVIDIA Optimus

The Linux Mint developers have revealed today in their regular monthly newsletter some more new features of the soon-to-be-released Linux Mint 20 “Ulyana” operating system, which will be coming later this month based on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa). One of these upcoming features is improved support for NVIDIA Optimus. In Linux Mint 20, the NVIDIA Prime system tray applet will now let users select the GPU they want to use and also display the GPU renderer, as you can see from the image below, courtesy of the Linux Mint project. Moreover, a new “Run with NVIDIA GPU” right-click context menu option was implemented in the applications menu in Cinnamon and MATE desktops to allow users to easily run apps with their dedicated NVIDIA graphics card. Read more Direct: Monthly News – May 2020 Also: Linux Mint 20 To Better Fend Off Snaps, Improve NVIDIA Optimus Support

Compact Coffee Lake system features hot-swappable SATA

The Nuvo-7531 offers ruggedization features including -25 to 60°C operation, vibration resistance compliant with MIL-STD-810G, Method 514.6, Category 4, and shock resistance per Method 516.6, Procedure I, Table 516.6-II. There are EN 55032 and EN 55024 certifications for EMC, as well as humidity tolerance rated at 10%~ 90%, non-condensing. The GbE and USB ports are equipped with screw-lock mechanisms. Standard SKUs include the top-of-the-line 9th gen Coffee Lake Refresh, octa-core Core i7-9700E clocked at 2.6GHz/4.4GHz. The processors integrate Intel UHD graphics 630 and are accompanied by Intel H310 chipsets. As usual with Neousys, no OS was listed, but Linux should be a good fit. Read more

Linux Fu: Raspberry Pi Desktop Headless

It seems to me there are two camps when it comes to the Raspberry Pi. Some people use them as little PCs or even laptops with a keyboard and screen connected. But many of us use them as cheap Linux servers. I’m in the latter camp. I have probably had an HDMI plug in a Pi only two or three times if you don’t count my media streaming boxes. You can even set them up headless as long as you have an Ethernet cable or are willing to edit the SD card before you boot the machine for the first time. However, with the Raspberry Pi 4, I wanted to get to a desktop without fishing up a spare monitor. I’ll show you two ways to get a full graphical KDE desktop running with nothing more than a network connection. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (bind9, dosfstools, gst-plugins-good0.10, gst-plugins-ugly0.10, json-c, php-horde, php-horde-gollem, salt, and sane-backends), Fedora (drupal7, marked, NetworkManager, and wireshark), Mageia (gdb, jasper, and json-c), openSUSE (freetds, jasper, libmspack, mariadb-connector-c, sysstat, and trousers), Red Hat (bind), Scientific Linux (bind and freerdp), and SUSE (file-roller and java-11-openjdk).

  • New software security tool to detect bugs in OS

    The Universal Serial Bus (USB) connects external devices to a host. This interface exposes the OS kernels and device drivers to attacks by malicious devices. To help detect such vulnerabilities, EPFL researchers have come up with a new security tool called USBFuzz to identify vulnerabilities in the USB driver stacks of widely used operating systems, including Linux, Windows, and macOS.

  • Github uncovers malicious ‘Octopus Scanner’ targeting developers

    The malware is called the Octopus Scanner, and it targets Apache NetBeans, which is an integrated development environment used to write Java software. In its write-up of the attack, the GitHub Security Labs team explains how the malware lurks in source code repositories uploaded to its site, activating when a developer downloads an infected repository and uses it to create a software program.

  • Joomla Team Disclosed Data Breach Occurred Last Week

    Joomla! is one of the biggest CMS in the World, to be specific, it is the 3rd most popular after WordPress and Drupal. Being that big in the industry, even a tiny error can cause millions of users worldwide. Just a few days back, the Joomla! team announced a data breach that occurred accidentally last week. Thankfully, the breach does not affect millions but 2,700 users who registered on JRD, Joomla Resources Directory. The incident happened last week when a member of JRD left a full unencrypted backup of JRD on AWS S3 server. [...] Most of the users’ information involved in the breach is already public except the IP address and hashed passwords. If anyone found the backup and successfully unhashed the passwords, he can use those passwords on other websites like Gmail, Microsoft, Facebook, etc. to access them. If you are affected by the breach, used the same passwords on Gmail, Facebook, etc. as on JRD platform, change your passwords immediately.

  • KeePassXC review

    KeePassXC appeals to Linux users who want to handle their own password management offline, but the added effort involved and lack of built-in password sync will frustrate casual users.

  • Career Choice Tip: Cybercrime is Mostly Boring [iophk: Windows TCO]

    For example, running an effective booter service requires a substantial amount of administrative work and maintenance, much of which involves constantly scanning for, commandeering and managing large collections of remote systems that can be used to amplify online attacks.